word ending with ي yaa2 + possessive ي yaa2

Wyldephang

New Member
English (U.S.)
مرحباً! إسمي راين و أنا طالب جامعة. أسكن في ماريلاند

This is my first post at the Arabic forum and I thought I'd give a small introduction in addition to a question. I am a student at the University of Maryland University College majoring in English. At the university, I began studying Arabic, too, and want to become fluent. I hope to learn a lot at this forum and become closer to my goal!

My question is very simple. To denote the "possessive" in Arabic, we generally see the letter ي at the end of the word, as in كتابي.

With the word كرسي however, there is already a ي at the end of the word. To write "my chair," would we double the ي and write كرسيي or is there another way?

Like, if I wanted to write the sentence: I found it under my chair.

.___وجدته تحت كرس

Perhaps someone could clear up this confusion. :) It's nice meeting you all!

I hope my Arabic is not too hard to understand. I've only been studying for a short while! If there are other big mistakes, could you point them out? Thanks!
 
  • Haroon

    Senior Member
    Arabic-Egypt
    Hello, راين and welcome to the forum.
    note that the word " كرسيّ" shall be witten with the mark you see instead of double " ي".
     
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    Haroon

    Senior Member
    Arabic-Egypt
    after revising the rule I found that in case of كرسي it is written with either double or triple ي -
    i.e: كرسيّ or كرسييّ.
     

    Abu Talha

    Senior Member
    Urdu
    طيب وفي حالة "سعي" كيف ستضيف ياء الملكية..؟
    I'm thinking that the rule has to do with whether the final ياء is متحركة or not.

    For example الماضِي will become ماضِيَّ, and فِي will become فِيَّ.

    But سَعْيٌ , since the ياء is متحركة will become سَعْيِي.

    كرسيٌّ it seems is a special case, because the final ياء is already مشددة.
     

    lukebeadgcf

    Senior Member
    English – US
    Daee is right. Not all words that end in ي are the same. Wyldephang, this is actually a somewhat complicated issue, and you should ask specifically about the other words that Daee mentioned separately as to not bite off more than you can chew right now. Regarding your original question, most people forget that the word كرسيّ (chair) has a shadda on the ياء TO BEGIN WITH. So when you add a ياء, it is simply appended to the end and looks like:

    كُرْسِيّي my chair

    and is pronounced kursiyyii (the red is the syllabic stress). Again words like رأي سعي ماضٍ شاي etc. are different.

    Thank you for your introduction and we also look forward to helping you reach your Arabic-learning goals. :)

    سلام
    مرحباً! اسمي راين و أنا طالب جامعيّ. أسكن في ماريلاند
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Wyldephang

    New Member
    English (U.S.)
    Thanks for the revision! I can see why we would add the ي to jaamia'a (جامعة) and drop the taa marbuta ة since we are making the word "university" an adjective. But is there a reason that we drop the hamza at the beginning of ismii (اسمي)? Is it unusual to see the hamza below the alif?

    Another question regarding possessives: you mentioned that the word "tea" (شاي) has a different method for denoting possessive. Is it because "my tea" would be an awkward phrase in Arabic?
    Thanks!
     
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    lukebeadgcf

    Senior Member
    English – US
    You're welcome!

    But is there a reason that we drop the hamza at the beginning of ismii (اسمي)? Is it unusual to see the hamza below the alif?
    It is because it is a همزة وصل and not a همزة قطع. There are a handful of nouns that take همزة وصل instead of همزة قطعة like اسم and امرأة and اثنان. There are a great many threads dedicated to this topic. You could use the search box, or start a new thread if you don't find what you need.

    Another question regarding possessives: you mentioned that the word "tea" (شاي) has a different method for denoting possessive. Is it because "my tea" would be an awkward phrase in Arabic?
    "My tea" is simply شايي. I just mentioned it because it is different from كرسيّ, and can't be assumed to follow the same rules.
     
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    Hello to all!

    I have a question (more do about possessive suffixes). I’m just starting my journey of learning Arabic and شاي is giving me problems when adding ي for the first person singual possessive.

    I want to say “You’re drinking my tea.”

    I have only gotten as far as “... أَنتَ تشرب"

    Any help would be greatly appreciated! Also any books, websites, podcasts or whatever else you could think of to help me learn, I’m all ears!

    !شكرا
     
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