word for bits you gouge out when you sculpt wood

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susanna76

Senior Member
Romanian
Hi,

When you sculpt wood there's a tool called gouge. It's the first one on the table in this image:
http://thumbs.dreamstime.com/z/bowl-carving-wooden-using-hand-tools-35435782.jpg

Now, when you use it, you get curled bits of wood, similar to those in this image but more curly. What would you call those wood bits that you get in the process of sculpting?

I'm thinking of describing a process where you use a gouge and then paint those bits of wood and use them in a work of art.

Thank you!
P.S. Here's another image:
http://assets6.classicfm.com/2014/41/violin-making---getty-7-1413278349-view-1.jpg

This is a different tool (I don't know what it is) but those bits of wood are similar to the ones you get with a gouge. There should be a name for this type of wood "refuse"!
 
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  • susanna76

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Yes, and I knew that. I desperately groped for it but couldn't think of it somehow. Thank you both!
     

    Jason_2_toi

    Senior Member
    English-Scotland
    Yes, and I knew that. I desperately groped for it but couldn't think of it somehow. Thank you both!
    Susanna, after reading this thread again, I'm thinking, why not gougings?
    Shavings are what you get when you plane wood with a plane. They don't really convey the curly, gouged shape!
     

    susanna76

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Interesting. The only thing is, I can't use "gougings" because I'm also using the word "gouge." I agree now that shavings doesn't cover it, but I don't have a better option right now.
     

    Jason_2_toi

    Senior Member
    English-Scotland
    I agree that scrappings sounds odd. Maybe one p less would work better!
    Seriously, shavings or gougings.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    "Chips"* is a normal word for short, fairly thick pieces of wood removed by a gouge. The appearance of these "chips" varies according to the depth of the gouge and the texture of the wood.

    I probably wouldn't use "shavings", but "curly shavings" or "curls" makes some sense if you are talking about a shallow gouge that removes little strips of wood that curl up as they are removed.

    *Two of my woodcarving friends regularly used "chips". It sounded normal to me, and I had no reason to doubt their choice.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    "Flakes" makes some sense, but I've never heard anybody talking about "wood flakes".

    "Shavings" seems more appropriate for the wood removed by a draw knife or a plane. I don't like the term if you're talking about the wood removed with a gouge, which really doesn't "shave" the wood.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    *Two of my woodcarving friends regularly used "chips". It sounded normal to me, and I had no reason to doubt their choice.
    Perhaps because they do chip carving, which is a particular wood carving technique. I think shavings is the generic term. I have mounds of them round my lathe, mostly created with a gouge. Not carving, I know, but a gouge is a gouge.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    That was a reasonable guess, Andy, but I looked up "chip carving" and none of that stuff looked anything like the work of those friends of mine. Both of them used big gouges and mallets to rough out figures in the round. The chips in their waste piles were fairly thick, fairly short, and slightly curled. They weren't typically long curled slivers or anything that looked much to me like "shavings".

    Their term might have been an idiosyncrasy or a local oddity, but it sure made sense to me when I saw the sorts of "chips" they left behind after a few hours of digging away at large pieces of wood. Perhaps they used "shavings" for the waste left later in their projects as they were smoothing out the rough work. I really don't know.
     
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