Word for Religious Discrimination/Hatred

SJ-10

New Member
English
Is there an easy to use word to describe the claim of superiority of one type of person over another based on religion, or discrimination based on religion? A word similar to "racist" or "sexist" but on the basis of religion?

This guy won't let Christians into his bar because he thinks they are dogs. Clearly, he is a _____ and that is a _____ policy.
 
  • bicontinental

    Senior Member
    English (US), Danish, bilingual
    If religious discrimination doesn't work for you... how about religious intolerance, or maybe (in this case) Christianophobia? (I prefer the first option myself)
    Bic.
     

    tonygray123

    New Member
    SPANISH
    So many words really reading this post has surely increased my vocabulary and in true sense I am liking this place a lot learn and to share your experience with these many Knowledgeable people around the world a great one indeed.Having an awesome experience.
     

    SJ-10

    New Member
    English
    Thank you guys for the feedback!

    I think we should allow universal use of the suffix, "ism". Christianism, religionism, gayism, handicapism etc.

    It seems they are trying to start this process with "phobia", as was mentioned, but this means fear, not hate. So it causes confusion. I don't know how the terms "homophobia" and "Islamophobia" came about instead.

    Bigot isn't specific enough; I think at a minimum you would need three words to get your point across. He's a bigot towards Christians.

    Religious intolerance and religious discrimination are very common, but could be ambiguous and so to be truly straight-forward you would need further words. Of course, everyone knows what you mean anyway; I just mean it's technically ambiguous, so wouldn't work for writing which is required to be up to truly pedantic standards.

    What I mean is that you could theoretically be meaning that your intolerance isn't towards other religions, but actually caused by religion, without necessarily knowing what it is your religion is causing you to be intolerant about.

    I must excercize my religious discrimination and make sure I only eat Kosher and avoid all other meat.
     
    Last edited:

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Bigot isn't specific enough; I think at a minimum you would need three words to get your point across. He's a bigot towards Christians.
    Why don't you think your example: This guy won't let Christians into his bar because he thinks they are dogs. Clearly, he is a bigot and that is a bigoted policy. is an insufficient context to get the point across?
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    It seems they are trying to start this process with "phobia", as was mentioned, but this means fear, not hate. So it causes confusion. I don't know how the terms "homophobia" and "Islamophobia" came about instead.
    The Free Dictionary, definition 2:

    pho·bi·a (f
    b
    -
    )
    n.1. A persistent, abnormal, and irrational fear of a specific thing or situation that compels one to avoid it, despite the awareness and reassurance that it is not dangerous.
    2. A strong fear, dislike, or aversion.
     

    SJ-10

    New Member
    English
    The Free Dictionary, definition 2:

    pho·bi·a(f
    b
    -
    )
    n.1. A persistent, abnormal, and irrational fear of a specific thing or situation that compels one to avoid it, despite the awareness and reassurance that it is not dangerous.
    2. A strong fear, dislike, or aversion.
    I could have sworn I checked the dictionary and ruled that out! I just checked again and realized I was looking at the noun, which excludes hate, instead of the suffix, which includes it. Ooops. Thanks for teaching me!:thumbsup:

    Can phobia be used for general religious hate, not specific to one religion?

    Like, he's a religionophobe (doesn't like religious people).

    I suppose it still has the problem of being ambiguous though.
     
    Last edited:

    SJ-10

    New Member
    English
    Why don't you think your example: This guy won't let Christians into his bar because he thinks they are dogs. Clearly, he is a bigot and that is a bigoted policy. is an insufficient context to get the point across?
    The example was so you guys knew what I was after in terms of what type of word, not necessarily how I would apply it. I just want the most concise way possible with the minimal amount of necessary context.

    Which I think I now have. So something like this:

    Me: I don't like him.

    Them: Why not?

    Me: He's a Christianophobe.


    Nice and concise, just as I sometimes like!

    Although that could mean I'm afraid of Christians, not intolerant.

    Why is there no good straight-forward word, like racist which works so perfectly for what it means?

    I still think the best thing is to coin the phrase "religionism".
     
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    icecreamsoldier

    Senior Member
    New Zealand English
    Much more common for this sort of thing than the suffix "-ist" or "-ism" is the prefix "anti-".
    "anti-religion" or "anti-religious" could work here.

    "I don't like him; he's overbearingly anti-Christian."
     

    nodnol

    Senior Member
    English UK
    In further response to post #7: I expect new words follow rules, and the words that you suggest could break those rules. If we accept christianism, would we have to say that surrealism is discrimination against the surreal, or that impressionism is discrimination against the impressionistic? - But despite that, if people felt that there was a need for the new words Christianism, religionism, gayism, handicapism, ie if they felt that they expressed an idea better than existing words and phrases could --and not just, that they were shorter-- they could become popular. (Islamophobia is a new word dealing with a new phenomenon; it says that many of the people who are against Islam are ignorant and irrational, whereas previously, people who strongly criticised Islam may have been more thoughtful and reasonable. Note: phobia means fear in the sense: suspicious of them, expecting them to do evil things.)

    So, in summary, the English language has a lot of good words, it's normally best to use them:
    This man discriminates against Christians. This is clearly a policy which discriminates against Christians/ discriminates on grounds of faith/ grounds of religion.
    unless you want to achieve a special rhetorical effect, or express a new idea (which may risk sounding silly, especially in the 3rd example,) in which case be inventive eg
    This man is a Christianophobe. This is a christianophobic policy.
    This man is an anti-christian, a fundamentalist anti-christian. This is an anti-christian policy.
    In modern Britain, anti-christianism is as much a threat to our way of life as nazism once was.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    So he's an anti-Christian bigot, perhaps a hatemonger, and his policy is biased, bigoted, discriminatory, intolerant (that last is rather mild).
     
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