Word for sheep manure

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boozer

Senior Member
Bulgarian
Hi friends

While discussing something with a colleague today, I stumbled upon a crucial gap in my vocabulary. :) Is there a dedicated word for the small olive-like pieces of sheep manure? Or goats' manure, which is the same, to my inexpert eye :)


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  • boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    There were......................... scattered around.

    I would expect it to be plural, like 'balls' or 'droppings' or 'pellets'. Context does not really matter here - I just cannot find anything in dictionaries.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    "Sheep droppings". You can use "droppings" on its own if you aren't sure of the animal, but this could possibly be misconstrued as something else that had been dropped, if the context isn't clear.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    "Droppings for me, too. It only becomes "manure" when it's ready to go on my garden.

    If I need to be specific and talk about one little pellet, I think that's what I'd say:

    Today we are going to study sheep droppings. Each of you take one pellet and examine it closely.

    See also: Difference : manure, dropping, dung
     
    Last edited:

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I don't know if it is a dialect word (East Midlands) but to me, sheep droppings, (and also rabbit droppings) are 'kittles'. The essence is that they are small, individual, and roughly spherical in shape.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    That is indeed a serious lacuna in your vocabulary, Booz:rolleyes:

    Kittles
    is nice, Mr Q. (Nope, never heard of it.)

    When I was a child we called them raisins. (Yes, really.)
     

    Orble

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    We seem to enjoy using “sheep poo” in Australia. A TV gardening show has a recipe for “sheep poo tea” and a museum has a story about, “How sheep poo can help us defend threatened native plants”:
    So, time to get our hands dirty- what can the poo tell us? We sampled poo from 24 individuals, split between Merinos, Dorpers (and goats as a control), from sheep stations between Broken Hill, Mildura and Ivanhoe.​
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I don't like being crude, but I live in the middle of sheep farms and realistically, people who raise sheep (or other animals) tend to be rather earthy.

    I don't recommend it for polite company, but around here, "sheep shit" predominates.
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Wow, what an array of fantastic answers. :thumbsup: Thank you all, dear friends. :)

    Look, my initial inclination was to use 'droppings', for lack of a better word (or describe them as 'pellets') but that sounded to me way too unspecific and euphemistic (as Orble says), like an inferior substitute of the 'real thing', whatever it was. The things we are talking about are so specific and unique in shape (less so in composition :D) that I felt they ought to have a word of their own. Indeed, as is the case in my language, the word we use is not really a word, so I checked dictionaries but had little hope of finding anything. And, unsurprisingly, did not.

    So, special thanks for the 'kittles', Paul, and the 'raisins', Ewie*. Excellent suggestions and, undoubtedly, just what I was looking for. I understand, of course, that those will not be readily understood out of context, but we hardly ever converse without context and, in any case, the same could be said of the word I use in my language - it is standard in some parts of the country and unheard-of in others.

    * and, Ewie, I also enjoyed your 'lacuna' :) :thumbsup:
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Ewe berries :D I like it, even though 'ewe', the ram's wife, tends to sound confusing, unless you see the word spelled out...
     
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