word order in written language

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greenish.eve

Member
Polish
Hello Everyone

Will this sentence - if listed as an item - look good on an info' board:

  • take everything you brought here back with you
?
or shall I rephrase it:

  • take everything you brought back with you
    or better:

  • take back with you everything you brought [here]
    ?

    Which of the 4 above options 'sounds' best to you?
 
  • Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I count only three options, and the last one is the one I'd use, because it's the one that makes sense; please note that as it's a complete (imperative) sentence, it should start with a capital letter and end with a period.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "Back" is probably not needed at all. If you must use it, it would be clearer by "take." By moving it after "brought", we don't know if it applies to "take" or "brought" without more context. ("Everything you brought back" could be a different set of things than "everything you brought".)
     

    Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    What is the context? Where is the info board? A meeting room? A campsite? A desk? What kind of stuff are you talking about?

    Sometimes parks have a "pack out everything you packed in" policy, which really means "take your garbage with you - don't leave it here." Is this what you're trying to say?
     

    JustKate

    Senior Member
    I agree with Sparky - I can't figure out what you're talking about here, greenish, and that makes it difficult to help you. All three of your sentences are grammatical, except for the lack of initial capital letters and periods that others have mentioned.

    Please tell us what the context is for this "info board" - that is, where will it be, who will be reading it - and also what you're trying to say. For example, what might "everything you brought here" refer to?
     

    greenish.eve

    Member
    Polish
    Thank you, Sparky Malarky. Also, many thanks to Those who opted for the last choice. Parla, I meant 4 due to the fact that here might be left out in the last version.
    The board is designated for a nature conserve and several items are listed as a continuation of an introductory clause [hence no capitalization, punctuation]. Is it legitimate to place the imperative expression:

    - pack out everything you packed in

    on the board, without being offensive to potential readers/ passers-by/ tourists? Is this what you'd find in American nature preserves?
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    They all seem a bit verbose to me.

    In the UK we see "take your litter home" in this context. Short and sweet.

    or

    "leave nothing but footprints"
     
    Last edited:

    greenish.eve

    Member
    Polish
    Yes, it is popular. Often teamed with "take nothing but photographs".
    You can see some quite nice examples if you search for either of these phrases in Google Images.
    :)
    I like the one 'Kill nothing but time'.
    I still have a question regarding 'keeping quiet/ keeping silence', yet I'd have to start a new thread (?), I'm afraid.......
     
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