word similar to doom (verb)

ksenilam

New Member
India - Bengali & English
I'm trying to remember a word similar to doom as in "Doing this doomed someone to something", except less condemnatory. It essentially means forcing someone into a possibly unwanted situation.

Any ideas?
 
  • timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    I also thought of condemn - but it's also quite condemnatory, by definition:D.

    It's rather colloquial, but I thought of "stuck with".

    The files were lost which stuck me with a week of photocopying.

    Edit - actually, ksenilam, context is somewhat lacking in your question. There are quite a few verbs which could work depending on what you mean - what was the unwanted situation?
     

    ksenilam

    New Member
    India - Bengali & English
    There are quite a few verbs which could work depending on what you mean - what was the unwanted situation?
    Cancelling his plane ticket forced Joey to spend an extra day on the island.

    Doom is way too strong and condemn is even worse. Destine doesn't really fit. I tried looking at a thesaurus and none of the synonyms are really appropriate, except maybe consign. What do you think?
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Cancelling his plane ticket forced Joey to spend an extra day on the island.

    Doom is way too strong and condemn is even worse. Destine doesn't really fit. I tried looking at a thesaurus and none of the synonyms are really appropriate, except maybe consign. What do you think?
    Well, your use of "force" sounds quite good - this has negative connotations in the way you suggest.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I agree with Timpeac, Ksenilam. "Forced" is really good in your sentence, much better than "consigned" would be.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I agree that forced is good.

    Compelled is also possible, if you want a slightly more formal word, and if you don't mind the similarity of canceled and compelled.
    Cancelling his plane ticket compelled Joey to spend an extra day on the island.​
     

    ksenilam

    New Member
    India - Bengali & English
    Well, your use of "force" sounds quite good - this has negative connotations in the way you suggest.
    Yeah, only I'm thinking of nominalizing the object, as in "... Xed Joey to an extra day on the island". That's the difficulty.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    "Xed Joey to an extra day on the island" - this would be better with "into": Forced Joey into an extra day on the island. I'd like it better with "spending": Forced Joey into spending an extra day on the island.
     

    ksenilam

    New Member
    India - Bengali & English
    "Xed Joey to an extra day on the island" - this would be better with "into": Forced Joey into an extra day on the island. I'd like it better with "spending": Forced Joey into spending an extra day on the island.
    Exactly, that's why I need a different word on the pattern of "... doomed Joey to an extra day on the island." Trouble is, that makes the island sound more like Alcatraz (or the 9th circle of hell) than Maui.
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Yeah, only I'm thinking of nominalizing the object, as in "... Xed Joey to an extra day on the island". That's the difficulty.
    Then how about my earlier "stuck with" - cancelling his ticket stuck Joey with another day on the island.

    Actually, you can also use "to land with" instead of "to stick with", and therefore have a bit of a play on words (because he is literally landed!)

    Cancelling his ticket landed Joey with an extra day on the island.
     

    ksenilam

    New Member
    India - Bengali & English
    What's wrong with "Forced Joey into spending..."?
    To be honest, that doesn't sound very grammatical in my opinion, but that might just be a matter of style. "... forcing Joey to spend ..." sounds a whole lot better to me.

    Then how about my earlier "stuck with" - cancelling his ticket stuck Joey with another day on the island.

    Actually, you can also use "to land with" instead of "to stick with", and therefore have a bit of a play on words (because he is literally landed!)

    Cancelling his ticket landed Joey with an extra day on the island.
    Thanks, I really appreciate your help. It's just that this one word keeps eluding me.
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top