words with Latin roots

  • Marga H

    Senior Member
    Poland,Polish
    Dzień dobry!
    The topic of your post is very interesting!However it is difficult to reply you because of "embarras de richesse"Polish language has lots of words with Latin roots ,in days of old it was the language of educated people.Maybe is a special field which are you interested in?
    Pozdrowienia!
    To bardzo interesujący temat!Trudno jednak odpowiedzieć na twój post,bo takich słów jest w języku poskim bardzo dużo.(Łacina była kiedyś językiem ludzi wykształconych.)Może jakaś dziedzina szczególnie Cię interesuje?
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    I think medicine is a real realm of Latinisms (e.g. medycyna, bronchit, astma, diabetyk and many others) but this is the case with many languages, I think. Although, many words are used in common parlance too.

    Law is another one as well as physics and chemistry but if you are talking about everyday usage-- it is quite hard to say which words are of Latin origin without looking into a dictionary.

    Here are a few (I guess):
    matematyka, materia, ornament, poemat, fiskus

    I've got the impression that we had a similar thread already...

    Tom
     

    Seana

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Hello,

    Yes, Thomas is right. I remember this thread Polish: words with Latin roots was opened by drei_lengua. It even inspired me to starting my own Polish: roots and influences about other roots and influences in Polish language.
    I have seen it as a very interesting topic but unfortunately it has finished without the success.
    Polish language was/is the one which was subjected by various influences mostly as a result of its very complicated history within centuries.
    Before Polish statehood and Christian order were established, Polish existed only as a spoken language. Adopting the Latin alphabet, made it possible to write down, but the first manuscripts have written by the best educated Polish clergymen in Latin.
    Latin started to influence Polish and incorporated religious and liturgical vocabulary, often via Czech and German.
    When borrowing Latin words we have chnged their spelling, for example, the Latin suffix spelled '-tio - tia' to '-cja'.
    inauguratio,inauguracja
    devastatio,dewastacja
    frequentia- frekwencja
    the digraph 'qu' becomes 'kw' quadrant - kwadrant.
    admiralis- admiral
    crimen - kryminal
    conservativus -konserwatywny
    secretum - sekret -
    emigratio - emigracja -
    personalia - personalne
    etc. etc...
    In Polish dictionary there are loads of words with Latin origin but French and Greek as well.
     

    Frank06

    Senior Member
    Nederlands / Dutch (Belgium)
    Hi,

    I think it is necessary to make a distinction between Greek and Latin in the first place. Quite some words given already seem to have Greek origins. (Though quite some Greek words did arrive in other languages via Latin.)

    Secondly, one should also distinguish between loan words and inherited words with (very similarly looking) cognates in other languages.
    I strongly doubt that 'dom' is a loan word from Latin (at least, if I correctly interpret the data found here, in the Slavic Inherited Lexicon).
    Proto-Slavic domú and Latin domus are cognates, which mean they both go back to the same Proto-Indo-European word/root. Otherwise said, Proto-Slavic domú, Polish dom don't have Latin roots.

    Groetjes,

    Frank
     

    Seana

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Hello Frank,

    I am very sorry but I don't agree with it

    In my opinion 'dom' should be used as home rather not a house as a building.

    Ethymology - latin domesticus 'domowy' i domicilium 'siedziba' from domus 'dom'.

    source
     

    Frank06

    Senior Member
    Nederlands / Dutch (Belgium)
    Hi,

    I am very sorry but I don't agree with it.
    Never feel sorry for disagreeing :)
    In my opinion 'dom' should be used as home rather not a house as a building. Ethymology - latin domesticus 'domowy' i domicilium 'siedziba' from domus 'dom'.
    As far as I can see and as far as I understand, the source you posted gives the etymology of domestykacja and domicyl, but not of 'dom'.
    I double checked, and also this source (you have to scrol down till *dom-, *dóm-o-) gives a PIE etymology for Polish dom, rather than a Latin one.

    Take good care.

    Groetjes,

    Frank
     

    werrr

    Senior Member
    I agree with Frank06. The influence of Latin on the family of Slavic languages was very unequal, but the word "dom" is Panslavic. The PIE origin is more acceptable.

    I always wonder at Polish zdecydować. The other Slavic variants are overshadowed. I see no reason to use this Latin word (I know it is'nt adopted directly from Latin, but it originated in Latin decernere).
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Hello Frank,

    I am very sorry but I don't agree with it

    In my opinion 'dom' should be used as home rather not a house as a building.

    Ethymology - latin domesticus 'domowy' i domicilium 'siedziba' from domus 'dom'.

    source
    You aren't exactly on the money saing so and the proportion of the usage of its senses by the Polish is more or less six of one and half a dozen of the other. I always used it and still use as home and house, I am a tad astonished at your comment since we don't have the difference which English has.

    [...]
    In my opinion 'dom' should be used as home rather not a house as a building. Ethymology - latin domesticus 'domowy' i domicilium 'siedziba' from domus 'dom'.
    As far as I can see and as far as I understand, the source you posted gives the etymology of domestykacja and domicyl, but not of 'dom'.
    I double checked, and also this source (you have to scrol down till *dom-, *dóm-o-) gives a PIE etymology for Polish dom, rather than a Latin one.

    Take good care.

    Groetjes,

    Frank
    To my native knowledge you're right on this one. The terms in the entry linked to by Seana are used in the jargon of lawyers and a plethora of them is indeed of Latin origin (including the ones in question, OC). They sound really formal to me almost like straight from an office. They have a different origin from our dom which is very likely to be, as you said, of Proto-Slavic origin (btw, domú is the kreska above the u a designate of its quantity, please?).

    I agree with Frank06. The influence of Latin on the family of Slavic languages was very unequal, but the word "dom" is Panslavic. The PIE origin is more acceptable.

    I always wonder at Polish zdecydować. The other Slavic variants are overshadowed. I see no reason to use this Latin word (I know it is'nt adopted directly from Latin, but it originated in Latin decernere).
    I don't see any counterarguments why we shouldn't use it. :D

    Tom
     

    cajzl

    Senior Member
    Czech
    Some common words:

    mass - msza - mše (< missa)
    church (building) - kościół - kostel (< castellum)
    altar - ołtarz - oltář (< altarium)
    shirt - koszula - košile (< casula)
    onion - cebola - cibule (< caepa, caepula)
    parsley - pietruszka - petržel (< petroselinum)
    colour - kolor - (barva) (< color)
     

    Seana

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Hi,

    If you don't mind I would like to return to the topic about ethymology one of the very important Polish word - 'dom' once again.

    Latin 'domus', or at 'domi' means: at one's (own) place, at home.
    as the symbol of the family, the tribe (domus te nostra tota salutat- Cicero), as well as sect and school.
    Latin word 'foris' is meaning out-of-doors, beyond the walls.

    So the meaning of word 'dom' is much closer to the meaning of English word 'home' then 'house'.
     

    Frank06

    Senior Member
    Nederlands / Dutch (Belgium)
    Hi,
    If you don't mind I would like to return to the topic about etymology one of the very important Polish word - 'dom' once again.
    Latin 'domus', or at 'domi' means: at one's (own) place, at home.
    Latin word 'foris' is meaning out-of-doors, beyond the walls.
    So the meaning of word 'dom' is much close meaning of word 'home' then 'house'.
    Again, I am afraid that I have to disagree :).
    It's not (only) the meaning that is important when dealing with the etymology of a word, and yet that seems to be your only issue (if I understood well). The argument of meaning you use here really is not enough to [edit]undermine[/edit] the well-established etymology of the word 'dom'.

    [Edit: From Beekes' Vergelijkende Taalwetenschap" (Translated as Comparative Indo-European linguistics): "the (PIE) word for house was *do:m (...Old Church Slavonic dom', Gr. domos, Lat. domus)".
    BTW, the English word 'timber' is related to the PIE root *demH-, from which *dom is the o-grade.]

    Take good care,

    Frank
     

    Frank06

    Senior Member
    Nederlands / Dutch (Belgium)
    Hi Seana,
    Could you have a look on this website about some terms mutated from Latin in Sardinian language. [...] domu, from the Latin domus, meaning home:
    The phrasing on the website is a bit weird (cf. 'mutating'), but it looks acceptable.
    But I don't really understand what information on a toursitic website about Sardinian has to do with Polish. It is certainly not an argument in favour of the Latin roots of Old Church Slavonic 'domь' and Proto-Slavic *domu-.
    If you are referring to the 'home/house' thing, I can only repeat that it is not a valid argument either.
    BTW, Lat. domum means both house and home.
    Could you please explain a bit more what you meant?

    Thanks, and take good care,

    Frank
     

    Seana

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Hi Frank,
    Remorsefully I must admit I was wrong.
    I agree wirh you. Giving a PIE etymology for Polish dom, rather than a Latin one you are probably/certainly right.
    It is a lingual forum so I wouldn't like to my post could misled somebody.
    Although many dictionaries are giving Latin roots of this word I think that influences are previous just from PIE.
    :)
    Frank06 said:
    BTW, Lat. domum means both house and home.Could you please explain a bit more what you meant?

    I am a civil engineer so the words connected with houses and building are used very often by me in everyday life. But I must say my colleagues and I rarely use word 'dom=home' as describing the building in our professional jargon. It is really a nuance but a dom=home is for me rather something more abstract, just my own place, the family, maybe even homeland, the climate, something like in Polnd is said "Sheltered place of the home bonfire"

    best regards Seana
     

    Frank06

    Senior Member
    Nederlands / Dutch (Belgium)
    Hi,
    Although many dictionaries are giving Latin roots of this word I think that influences are previous just from PIE.
    Many dictioanaries? Interesting.
    This could shed a new light upon the relation Sl. dom - Lat. domus - PIE *dom-. Maybe I did misinterpret a few things earlier on.
    Which dictionaries exactly? And could you give the relevant quotes?

    Thanks in advance.

    Groetjes,

    Frank
     

    Tantrum

    New Member
    Polish Poland
    Some common words:

    mass - msza - mše (< missa)
    church (building) - kościół - kostel (< castellum)
    altar - ołtarz - oltář (< altarium)
    shirt - koszula - košile (< casula)
    onion - cebola - cibule (< caepa, caepula)
    Onion in Polish is "cebula"
     
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