work directly against / pinpoint

meijin

Senior Member
Japanese
Hi, please see the following sentence I made up, imagining your friend saying it to you.

"This medicine, which my doctor gave me, worked directly against my symptom (e.g. rhinitis, arthritis)."

Does the sentence sound natural and make sense? I would have used a word "pinpoint" if I were the speaker and were speaking in Japanese. Do you use "pinpoint" the way we do? If so, how do you use it in the sentence above?
 
  • meijin

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    If "pinpoint" is a wrong word in the above context, you can forget it and can just let me know if the sentence makes sense and sounds idiomatic. I'd say "worked directly against my symptom" means "didn't affect other areas of my body" (i.e. no side effects).
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The way you've put it is not at all idiomatic. What you mean is obviously that the medicine acted specifically on the part of the body that it was intended to treat. But I don't think there's any particular short way of saying this.
     

    meijin

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Here's another attempt.

    This medicine, which my doctor gave me, worked precisely on my symptom.

    Still odd?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Not very odd – apart from that non-restrictive clause being inappropriate and symptoms usually being used in the plural. :)

    As I say, there is no set phrase, but another way of putting it could be:
    This medicine my doctor gave me has targeted my symptoms really accurately.
     

    meijin

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    I like the "target" and "accurately". I didn't know that "symptom" is usually used in the plural. The "singular or plural?" has almost become my daily battle.
     
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