work <from ... to / from ... through>

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luineida

New Member
Spanish - Cuba
Which is the correct way: "I work from Monday to Friday" or "I work from Monday through Friday".
 
  • cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Both are correct, though the meanings may be different. Context would be a help, together with an explanation or paraphrase.

    Welcome to the forums, luineida!
     

    luineida

    New Member
    Spanish - Cuba
    The context for "from to or from through" question is the following:

    "This store opens "from Monday to Friday" OR "from Monday through Friday".

    Another one: I have to work "from Monday to Friday" OR "from Monday through Friday".

    What is the difference if there is any?

    Thanks
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Hi luineda :)
    For me, if you said or wrote "Monday through Friday" I would know you were speaking AE - American English - and you meant that the store opens (or you work) on the five days Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday.

    Over here we would say (in BE, British English) "Monday to Friday" with the same meaning.
     

    tannen2004

    Senior Member
    English/USA
    I would find "from Monday through Friday" to be a bit odd. Instead I would say just simply "Monday through Friday" (The store is open Monday through Friday).

    "The store is open from Monday to Friday" as everyone has said is also fine.

    In my experience both are common in AE.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Here is another thread on the ways people would say this: Mondays 'to / through' Sundays.

    I am one of the American English speakers Panjandrum is talking about: I prefer through. However, I don't think he meant that all AmE speakers would use through, but only that a BrE speaker would not.
     
    Last edited:

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Here is another thread on the ways people would this: Mondays 'to / through' Sundays.

    I am one of the American English speakers Panjandrum is talking about: I prefer through. However, I don't think he meant that all AmE speakers would use through, but only that a BrE speaker would not.
    Indeed ... a BE speaker almost certainly would not and would presume that someone who did was from the US.
    This use of "through" used to be a reliable indicator. It is less so now than before.
     

    Smithy73

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    British English: "I work from Monday to Friday"
    American English: "I work from Monday through Friday" - this to me seems more colloquial.
     

    kika_meow

    Senior Member
    Spanish - México
    And from one time to the other (hour), example: "from 8:00 to 10:00 pm", does it work the same way as with days of the week? (British VS American english, etc)
     
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    Mahantongo

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    No. 10:00 p.m. is a single point in time that does not create ambiguity, unlike Friday, which is a 24-hour period.
     
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