work out (job)

brenobrendan

Senior Member
Portuguese - Brazil
When you want to say that you do not work in your home. Like, you work at the bank, at the mall, etc. How do you say that in English?

Could it be "I work out"?
 
  • xqby

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    Working out means exercising, usually lifting weights. :)

    I'm not sure that I understand the question though. If I wanted to say that I do not work from home I would say, "I work in an office" or "I work in a bank" or "I work at the mall." There isn't a phrasal verb I know of to express working somewhere other than your home.
     

    brenobrendan

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    Working out means exercising, usually lifting weights. :)

    I'm not sure that I understand the question though. If I wanted to say that I do not work from home I would say, "I work in an office" or "I work in a bank" or "I work at the mall." There isn't a phrasal verb I know of to express working somewhere other than your home.
    For example, it is hard to take a care of a baby, do house cleaning and still have a job (that is not like some home office... to work outside the house, not inside)
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Since most people do work outside the home, I've never felt the need for such a phrase. However I remember a time when married women with families didn't usually have paid work. We would say "Mrs. Smith goes out to work". I think this would work in your sentence: "It's hard to take care of a baby.......and still go out to work".
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    The phrase I've usually seen used is "employed outside the home". Simply "I work in an office" wouldn't be sufficient; I do that, but the office is in my home (and that's true of many people I know).
     
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