work up about

mimi2

Senior Member
vietnam vietnamese
Hi,
Please explain the verb "work up about" in the sentence. Is it right when "work up" accompanied with "about"? Please help. Thanks.
"I've got myself really workd up about it - I got so worried that I really didn't go along at all,..."
 
  • elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    "I got worked up about it" means I got excited, riled up, or emotional about it. It's hard to pinpoint the exact connotation of the phrase in this particular case without more context.
     

    Joelline

    Senior Member
    American English
    mimi2 said:
    Hi,
    Please explain the verb "work up about" in the sentence. Is it right when "work up" accompanied with "about"? Please help. Thanks.
    "I've got myself really workd up about it - I got so worried that I really didn't go along at all,..."
    First, yes it is right to use "worked up" with "about" (you could also use I got worked up over it"

    As Elroy explained, "worked up about X" means to be upset, very emotional, disturbed, troubled about X.

    In your sentence, I think there's an added element: "I got myself" which suggests, perhaps, that you let yourself get too upset, too emotional, too disturbed about something. I wonder what the other foreros think about this reading of the sentence.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Joelline said:
    [...] I wonder what the other foreros think about this reading of the sentence.
    This one agrees with you.

    About is often omitted if the cause is obvious.
    I was really worried about the exams. The night before I was so worked up that I couldn't get to sleep at all.
     
    Joelline said:
    First, yes it is right to use "worked up" with "about" (you could also use I got worked up over it"

    As Elroy explained, "worked up about X" means to be upset, very emotional, disturbed, troubled about X.

    In your sentence, I think there's an added element: "I got myself" which suggests, perhaps, that you let yourself get too upset, too emotional, too disturbed about something. I wonder what the other foreros think about this reading of the sentence.

    A native of England agrees with you. :)

    I have a friend and neighbour who has the annoying habit of passing judgment on me. She can't help it, it's just the way she is. Mostly she is very pleasant.

    The first time she made an unjustified remark I got really worked up about it - to the point of anger. The only way to rid myself of these negative feelings was to confront her - no easy task for one who hates confrontations. I told her I wouldn't be spoken to in that way. Hallelujah! She apologised.

    Now when she says anything "out of place" I don't get myself worked up about it. I tell her immediately that she is being rude and that I won't stand for it. This never fails to produce an apology, followed by an awkward silence, but I always manage to turn the conversation around to things more positive.

    We are actually great friends. :)



    LRV
     

    Joelline

    Senior Member
    American English
    LRV,
    I think I honed in on the "I got myself worked up" part because I am not as wise as you! I stew and brood and get myself worked up again by mentally replaying such incidents (and revise them by imagining that I'd handled them as well as you!). I am surprised, however, that you havent' yet warned her about the penalties for the crime of lèse-majesté! :)

    Joelline

    To the Mod: did you notice that I used "worked up" twice here--so this is not just chat!

    <<No, I didn't. But I hadn't noticed either that it might be chat:p >>
     
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