Work vs Job

veggito72

Member
Ecuador - Español
Job is the noun of work, right?
So how can I make a difference in use in a sentence?

My job is to clean the room.
My work is to clean the room.

It's a nasty job, but someone's gotta do it.
It's a nasty work, but someone's gotta do it.

I believe that in the second example job is the best option.
 
  • Elwintee

    Senior Member
    England English
    Job is the noun of work, right?
    So how can I make a difference in use in a sentence?

    My job is to clean the room.
    My work is to clean the room.

    It's a nasty job, but someone's gotta do it.:tick:
    It's a nasty work, but someone's gotta do it.:cross:

    I believe that in the second example job is the best option.

    First of all, I don't know what you mean by job being the noun of work. Both words are nouns and they are more or less synonymous. In your sentences the slight difference is that a 'job' can be (but is not always) work that you do in a contractual way, usually with set hours and for pay. It can also be a single task. Work can be anything that requires effort, paid/unpaid, regular/done on one occasion.
    In your first sentence I would probably understand you to mean that you regularly clean the room, but I would need more context to be sure that the task involved wasn't being done just this once. In the second sentence, 'a' work is wrong in that context. We talk of 'a work of art/genius etc', but we do work (no indefinite article).
     

    liliput

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    Job usually refers to your position or employment, whereas as work refers to what the job involves - obviously, these are often interchangeable. Job can also refer to a specific task.

    Let's look at your examples:
    I have a job as a cleaner. It's my job to clean the rooms. The job consists of cleaning rooms.
    I work as a cleaner. I work cleaning rooms. The work consists of cleaning rooms.
    The staff work as a team to run the hotel, it's my job to clean the rooms.

    Let's look at another example of how someone might talk about their job:
    My job is Director of a regional office for a company which teaches English. I work as an office manager. My job consists of recruiting teachers, lliasing with clients, marketing courses and materials, and dealing with any problems that teachers might have. Sometimes I also work as a teacher and do odd jobs around the office. The job can be quite demanding but I enjoy it because I work with a lot of interesting people and I am paid quite well.

    The common expression in English is either:
    It's dirty work, but somebody's got to do it. (note the lack of article)
    or:
    It's a dirty job, but someone's got to do it.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Not to disagree with lilliput's excellent explanation, but there are additional usages, at least in AE.

    A "job shop" refers to a machine shop that accepts small assignments, e.g. one or two pieces. It charges "by the job."

    A "job ticket" is a piece of paper specifying a particular piece of work be done and carries the information with it. Such a document can be called a "work order."

    "I like to work with wood" means I like to build things from wood.

    "Jobbing something out" means to subcontract the work.

    A "jobber" is a wholesaler.

    To "work something out" is to resolve a disagreement.

    Good luck.
     

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I was pretty sure we say 'job' not 'work' while praising someone, for example, "Good job, Tom." So I picked 'job' in # 6 in this exercise .Yet the key says it is 'work'. Can you explain?

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    Hildy1

    Senior Member
    English - US and Canada
    "Work" is likely to be used as a non-count noun; "job" is likely to be a count noun.

    In sentence 6 of the exercise, either "job" or "work" would be acceptable. In the others, the clue is the presence or absence of a definite or indefinite article.
    Article + job
    No article + work

    This clue is not available in 6, which is not a complete sentence. It could be completed in different ways:
    - That's nice work, Harry!
    - You did nice work, Harry!
    - You've done a nice job, Harry!
    - That's a nice job, Harry!
     

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Another Brit confirms BE is being americanised. I guess the coursbooks here in Europe will need to be re-edited :)

    A few years ago I would have said 'work' but in maybe the last 10 years or so 'job' has become more usual.
     

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    "Work" is likely to be used as a non-count noun; "job" is likely to be a count noun.
    Generally we "go to work", which is an uncountable noun.
    I felt sick but I went to work yesterday.

    And what if I want to use work countably? I guess I need to switch to "jobs". Could we say "go to (number) jobs"? Say some did three jobs on a given day. First babysitting, then working part time at a drugstore and finally cleaning someone's house.
    Does this work?

    A: Ashley, you look exhausted. Are you sure you don't work too much?
    B: Yeah, I think I do. I went to three jobs yesterady. I know it's crazy but I just want to pay off the mortgage as soon as possible.
     
    • Agree
    Reactions: TGW

    FromPA

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Definition of the noun "Work":
    1. activity involving mental or physical effort done in order to achieve a purpose or result.
    "he was tired after a day's work"
    2. a task or tasks to be undertaken; something a person or thing has to do.
    "they made sure the work was progressing smoothly"

    Definition of the noun "Job":
    1. paid position of regular employment.
    2. a task or piece of work, especially one that is paid.


    The noun "job" is much more specific than the noun "work." A job entails doing some kind of work. A job is something you are employed/paid to do, or something that is your assigned responsibility to do. My job "at work" (i.e., my place of employment) is to make widgets. The work for my job (my employment) is making widgets. My jobs (assigned responsibilities) at home are to take out the trash and wash the dog, which isn't very hard work.

    "A work" is the end result of your efforts. A work of art.
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    Not surprisingly, some Americans say "work two jobs" and others say "work at two jobs." Both sound fine to me, although I say "work two jobs" without "at."
     

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I came across this sentence out of context. Does it work? If so, how do I interpret it?

    "I have been in 3 works."
     

    abluter

    Senior Member
    British English
    There's a nice term, "a job of work", which means a piece of work. A "task" is a job of work to be done.
     

    Logos14

    Senior Member
    USA
    English
    I've heard 'job of work' many times in America. It's probably much more common in the UK however.
     
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    Logos14

    Senior Member
    USA
    English
    I've mostly heard 'job of work' in old movies (1930s-40s). This aligns with the ngram that shows it peaking around WW II and then declining rather sharply: Google Books Ngram Viewer. It's used to describe a mundane gig that's to be done in a workmanlike manner, as opposed to the kind of work one does passionately: 'You may think being an artist is very romantic, but to me sculpting is merely a job of work.'
     

    FromPA

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I've mostly heard 'job of work' in old movies (1930s-40s). This aligns with the ngram that shows it peaking around WW II and then declining rather sharply: Google Books Ngram Viewer. It's used to describe a mundane gig that's to be done in a workmanlike manner, as opposed to the kind of work one does passionately: 'You may think being an artist is very romantic, but to me sculpting is merely a job of work.'
    Interesting. I would express that same idea as "it's just a job," meaning, I do it solely for the paycheck.
     
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