Working has been a <breeze>

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jexrry_nam

Senior Member
Cantonese
Dear all, :)

I've come across the word 'breeze' quite often. It's usually used by native speakers. I do know it is a slang.

What is actual meaning of it? Does it convey something is exciting and cool??

For instance: 'Working with you guys has been a breeze.'

Could anyone help me?

Thanks
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    It means that it's been very easy and pleasurable working with you.

    I wouldn't normally use in that context, although I'm sure others would. I would usually talk about a job or a project being a breeze, meaning easy.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    What is actual meaning of it? Does it convey something is exciting and cool??

    For instance: 'Working with you guys has been a breeze.'

    Could anyone help me?
    I think it means "easy" as CR says.

    I think of it as "Working with you guys has been a breath of fresh air."

    = Uncomplicated, simple, refreshing
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    "It was a breeze", as Copyright (and the WR dictionary) says, means that it was easy.
    (It's said of something that was easy to achieve, often unexpectedly)

    Breeze: an easy task [usually singular] That quiz was a breeze.

    I can't see that as being the same as "a breath of fresh air". It's a different idiom, but it may well be more in line with what the OP wants to express:
    "someone or something that is new and different and makes everything seem more exciting:
    Angela's so cheerful and lively - she's like a breath of fresh air when she visits."
    a breath of fresh air Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary

    a breath of fresh air
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    Are these different for you, veli?
    A) "Working with you guys has been a breath of fresh air."
    B) "Working with you guys has been a breeze."

    Which would you choose for jexrry's context?
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I think I made it clear in my post that they are different, and I was agreeing with you that the OP probably needs to use "a breath of fresh air".

    Maybe this:
    It's been cool working with you guys; you're (like) a breath of fresh air.

    I'm not sure: it isn't an expression that I use. Perhaps it isn't 'cool' enough.:cool:
     
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