worser / bestest

Little_LIS

Senior Member
Arabic,Egypt
Hello every body,

I looked up the word "worser" and I found that it is nonstandard comaparative of bad ! So, does it mean that it can be used but informally ?

And what about the usage of "bestest" ?

Thanks in advance :)
 
  • panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    See worser where it seems to be concluded that worser is often used either from ignorance or for fun - now. It was used by serious writers in the past.

    Searching for bestest will take you to one example - where it was used for fun.

    These are immediately recognisable words, but I suggest that you use them with care.
     

    Franzi

    Senior Member
    (San Francisco) English
    They're aren't just a little bit casual; they're very casual and can make you sound like you're using baby talk or being sarcastic or intentionally humorous. Like panjandrum said, you should be cautious about using these.
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    They're aren't just a little bit casual; they're very casual and can make you sound like you're using baby talk or being sarcastic or intentionally humorous. Like panjandrum said, you should be cautious about using these.
    I'd go even further and say - today - that they aren't even casual but only used if you are trying, deliberately, to use baby talk or be sarcastic, humourous etc - which may be casual or not. Someone might want to make fun of someone/something in a serious context and use such words. (I just don't want people to have the impression that a native speaker might ever use such words in any serious manner today).
     

    Nymeria

    Senior Member
    English - Barbadian/British/educated in US universities blend
    They're aren't just a little bit casual; they're very casual and can make you sound like you're using baby talk or being sarcastic or intentionally humorous. Like panjandrum said, you should be cautious about using these.
    They can make you sound like that at best. At worse people may assume that your English is poor, especially with 'worser' and particularly when used by a non-native speaker.
     

    *achille

    Member
    EN/IE, RO/RO
    Please note they contain built-in figures of speech: they are both superlatives of suprelatives (best/worst is a superlative best-est/wors-est repeats the suprlative suffix). The meaning they carry is of extreme positive or negative, which should be the case with the noun they determine. If reality is not extreme, then stick with regular forms.
     
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