Worth doing

Nonn

Senior Member
Japan - japanese
I am learning how to make sentences using " ______ is worth doing." For example, playing the piano is worth doing.

If I want to ask someone a question using the idea "worth doing", does "What is worth doing for you?" sound all right?

Thank you!
 
  • velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    "Playing the piano is worth doing" isn't quite right.

    An exercise is worth doing if it helps you learn something new.
    If a job is worth doing, it's worth doing well.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Grammatically.:) I could accept "Playing the piano is something worth doing".
    Would you accept: "Digging the garden is worth doing"?
     
    My imperfect "phrase-math":) equation:

    to be worth doing X = benefits derived from doing x must be equal to or greater than the effort expended in doing x

    Warning: I'm proposing questions, not giving answers...

    I'm thinking about taking up the piano. Someone says, "Do you think it's worth it?" = Are you prepared to expend all that time and energy?

    In the OP, it might be that we're talking about worthwhile, as in admirable.

    So, in either "playing the piano or digging the garden" does "worth doing" mean "something admirable to do" or "something that might pay off in the end", or both at once?

    I really don't know.

    (somewhat cross-posted)
     
    Last edited:

    Nonn

    Senior Member
    Japan - japanese
    Thank you for the interesting replies and answer to my question.

    I am looking at my old notebook with practice sentences using "______ is worth doing." I think the model sentence in the textbook is "making fireworks is worth doing."

    We practice making sentences by changing parts of the sentences. I understand the meaning may sound strange to native speakers but if it is wrong it is too surprising.

    Agreed. And that reason is that we don't "do playing something." Progressive forms don't take "do."
     

    Nonn

    Senior Member
    Japan - japanese
    If I don't have to use "worth doing", is "meaningful" a better word?

    Playing the piano is meaningful (to me).
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I am looking at my old notebook with practice sentences using "______ is worth doing." I think the model sentence in the textbook is "making fireworks is worth doing."
    Thanks Glen for the explanation; it sounds good to me.:thumbsup:

    You can't "do" making fireworks, so we don't say "Making fireworks is worth doing".
    You could say "It's worth making your own fireworks - you can have fun and save a lot of money" (But don't try it at home, folks,)

    Playing the piano is a worthwhile activity.
     
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