would doubtless be 'keen'

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perpend

Banned
American English
Changing the law to permit aggressive counter-measures would be controversial, though some in Congress would doubtless be keen.

Source: The Economist, May 25th, 2013.
http://www.economist.com/news/unite...against-cyber-thieves-fighting-chinas-hackers

This usage of keen is foreign to me.

I would expect:
.... would doubtless be keen to do so.
.... would doubtless be keen to do it.

After "keen" can you elide what is meant?

We do not have a very keen-sian society, in the USA, so it's confusing. Pun intended. :)
 
  • Groovo

    Member
    USA
    English (US)
    ... though some in Congress would doubtless be keen (to do so).

    The words in parentheses are implied without being stated.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    Is the usage of "keen" normal to you in American English, Groovo? Would you say something like what was written in the Economist?
     

    Groovo

    Member
    USA
    English (US)
    Personally, I would say "keen to do so" for clarity, because the original sentence sounds a little awkward to me. It is not wrong to imply (to do so), but it seems clumsy in this context.
     

    Groovo

    Member
    USA
    English (US)
    Keen used to be more prevalent in the 1930's - 1950's in the US. Little boys in movies of that era are always saying things like "You want to get me an ice-cream cone? Gee that's keen!", or adults might say "I'm not too keen on that idea." or even the over the top phrase "peachy-keen!" Its still used here, but as Parla said, it may be in wider use in the UK.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    That's my interpretation as well. But, I can work with "keen", but when it ends with "keen", in a sentence, meaning that the sentence ends with "keen".

    Ugh.

    EDIT: Cross-post with Groovo. My post was written to Parla.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Yes, I can say keen on its own. I can also describe someone as a keenie ... very keen! You can be keen to do things; you can also be keen on something.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    Does "keen" then at the end of a sentence mean:
    -- "kosher"
    -- "down with it"

    When the sentence ends with "keen", it makes me uncomfortable.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    Oh, that helps along. Beryl. Big hi.

    So they would be "approving"?

    EDIT: After writing, I realized I just don't command "keen" in this context.
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    These congressmen would not only view the aggressive counter-measures favourably, they'd be willing to expend effort in implementing a law that would permit such counter-measures.
     
    Last edited:

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    Ah. Second shoe has dropped.

    After your writing that, I don't agree with what the Economist wrote.

    But, I now understand what was intended.
     
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