would never or would entirely avoid

Unique.s

Senior Member
Nepal-Nepali
Could you please tell me why "would" has been used in the following sentences in



1. I would never write such a sentence, since to me it means that the nurse helped the patient to fall (i.e.
Because he was helped by one of the nurses ).
Instead I would say Despite/While being helped.

2. I would entirely avoid these constructions because they are so often misused and sound unnatural. Native speakers rarely use them as Paul already said. I don't know about your language, but these clumsy constructions seem very poplar in Indian varieties of English.


Source: "Being helped" vs "have been helped"

*I would never write
*I would entirely avoid

I think you will say "They are conditinal use of would". But I don't see any 'if clause' in those sentences. Are these implied conditinal sentences or what kind of use of "would" are there ?

OR

Is it the use of would of

Being less direct Would - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionary
We often use would with verbs such as advise, imagine, recommend, say, suggest, think to make what we say less direct.

OR what's the exact use of would in above both sentences? Please clearify it.
 
  • se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    They are conditional uses of "would".

    Sometimes we leave it to the listener or reader to guess what implied condition we have in mind. But here the adverbs "never" and "entirely" give a good clue that the implied condition is something like "even if my condition were desperate" or "even if exceptional circumstances tempted me".
     

    Unique.s

    Senior Member
    Nepal-Nepali
    I already guessed that you would say so. But I'm still confused here because I don't see any need to use 'would' in those sentences. They could also write as follows:

    1. I never write such a sentence, since to me it means that the nurse helped the patient to fall (i.e.
    Because he was helped by one of the nurses ).
    Instead I would say Despite/While being helped.

    2. I entirely avoid these constructions because they are so often misused and sound unnatural. Native speakers rarely use them as Paul already said. I don't know about your language, but these clumsy constructions seem very poplar in Indian varieties of English.
     
    Last edited:

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    *

    I think you will say "They are conditional use of would". But I don't see any 'if clause' in those sentences.
    Ah... and there is the problem. There are many times when a native English speaker omits words and phrases. But before we talk about that, "I would never write" and "I would entirely avoid" are only parts of a sentence and have no context. Would is used in polite advice. If we use them in a typical sentence:

    A: "What should I buy her for her birthday?"
    B: "I would buy her an iPhone." -> this is a suggestion. Would is used to introduce a suggestion or advice. It can also be understood as:
    B(i) "If I were you/ If I were in your position, I would buy her an iPhone."

    Would is also used to indicate a habit
    A: "Look what you have written here, "If you want to see mountains and beautiful valleys, go to nepal."
    B: "What is wrong with that?"
    A: "I would never write "Nepal" without a capital letter." -> Here the would indicates a habit or regular practice. "My/The regular practice is never to write "Nepal" without a capital letter."

    Compare, "Every morning, he would go for a long walk." -> would expresses a habit. (Often "used to" will be a good substitute.)
     

    Unique.s

    Senior Member
    Nepal-Nepali
    Ah... and there is the problem. There are many times when a native English speaker omits words and phrases. But before we talk about that, "I would never write" and "I would entirely avoid" are only parts of a sentence and have no context. Would is used in polite advice. If we use them in a typical sentence:

    A: "What should I buy her for her birthday?"
    B: "I would buy her an iPhone." -> this is a suggestion. Would is used to introduce a suggestion or advice. It can also be understood as:
    B(i) "If I were you/ If I were in your position, I would buy her an iPhone."

    Would is also used to indicate a habit
    A: "Look what you have written here, "If you want to see mountains and beautiful valleys, go to nepal."
    B: "What is wrong with that?"
    A: "I would never write "Nepal" without a capital letter." -> Here the would indicates a habit or regular practice. "My/The regular practice is never to write "Nepal" without a capital letter."

    Compare, "Every morning, he would go for a long walk." -> would expresses a habit. (Often "used to" will be a good substitute.)

    Thank you for explanation, I've learned in the dictionery that 'would' can be used to give advice, polite request, past habit(just like 'used to') . . .etc But I've never seen or Learned that 'would' can be used to mean 'present habit or regular practice'. Why this meaning of would hasn't been listed in the dictionery? Please respond me.
     
    Last edited:

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I've never seen or Learned that 'would' can be used to mean 'present habit or regular practice'.
    I cannot see the word "present" in anything I wrote. Can you help me?
    I think you have misunderstood "My/The regular practice is never to write "Nepal" without a capital letter."
     

    Unique.s

    Senior Member
    Nepal-Nepali
    Sir, You have written 'My/The regular practice is', here, I think 'Is' refers 'The habit' existing in the present.'

    on the otherhand, Time isn't fixed in 'My/The regular practice'

    "The/My Regular practice" is about past or present habit/practice ?
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Sir, You have written 'My/The regular practice is', here, I think 'Is' refers 'The habit' existing in the present.'
    If it is regular, I will have done it in the past also... it's origins are in the past but continue to the present. I still would[n't] do it.
     

    Unique.s

    Senior Member
    Nepal-Nepali
    If it is regular, I will have done it in the past also... it's origins are in the past but continue to the present. I still would[n't] do it.
    You mean we use 'would' if a past habit is continuing to present. BUT
    I have never found this kind of meaning of 'would' in the dictionery yet. What would you tell me about it?
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I'm sorry for sticking in it being persistent, BUT it's a big an important question, please reply me reply does not take an object, the verb you want is "respond."
    A: "I would never write "Nepal" without a capital letter." -> Here the would indicates a habit or regular practice. "My/The regular practice is never to write "Nepal" without a capital letter."

    The speaker has not, just that moment, decided that they will not write Nepal without a capital letter, and the speaker is not, in the future, going to start writing Nepal without a capital letter and, presently, the speaker still knows it is wrong to to write Nepal without a capital letter.

    You can take what I say, or you can leave it. You can see it as advice, or you can see it as regular practice.
     
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