Would she be (...) the expectations (missing prepositions and particles)

clapec

Senior Member
Italian
Could you please help me insert the two missing prepositions or particles in this sentence?

'Tomorrow for Jane was particularly stressful. She was starting a new job. Would she get on with her new colleagues? Would she be able to deal with her new boss? Would she be 1.______ 2.______ the expectations that had secured her the job in the first place?'.
 
  • James Stephens

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Very good work. Try this:

    'Tomorrow for Jane was would be particularly stressful. She was starting a new job. Would she get on with her new colleagues? Would she be able to deal with her new boss? Would she be 1.______ 2.______live up to the expectations that had secured her the job in the first place?'.
     

    nycphotography

    Senior Member
    American English
    Actually:

    tomorrow will be...
    the next day [from whenever this occurred] would be...

    The next day would be particularly stressful for Jane. She was starting a new job. Would she get on with her new colleagues? Would she be able to deal with her new boss? Would she be 1. up to 2. able to meet the expectations that had secured her the job in the first place?

    OR

    Tomorrow will be particularly stressful for Jane. She is starting a new job. Would she get on with her new colleagues? Would she be able to deal with her new boss? Would she be 1. up to 2. able to meet the expectations that had secured her the job in the first place?
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I'm sorry to be picky, but didn't clapec ask a very precise question?
    Could you please help me insert the two missing prepositions or particles in this sentence? [...]
    I don't like the sentences either - as already explained - but they are "given". We are asked to fill the gaps at (1) and (2):)

    NYC has suggested - up to.
     

    nycphotography

    Senior Member
    American English
    panjandrum said:
    I'm sorry to be picky, but didn't clapec ask a very precise question? I don't like the sentences either - as already explained - but they are "given". We are asked to fill the gaps at (1) and (2):)

    NYC has suggested - up to.

    I also suggested - able to meet.

    Edit: OOPS which isn't a preposition.

    What exactly is a particle?
     

    James Stephens

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    http://www.kansaigaidai.ac.jp/teachers/shinallj/phrasalverbs/grammar/grammar4.html
    This website defines particle as something that looks like a preposition, but isn't. Particles may attach themselves to verbs and form what I always thought of as simply idioms. Examples: Turn on the TV; move over; stop by after school; run in and get it; that boat is about to go under.

    Panjan has brought us back to the question posed by clapac. I propose the following: Would she be (1) able to (2) live up to the expectations This gives as an answer two particles, no prepositions. We did however, have to add the verbs to hang the particles on. Whew! What a test!
     

    charlie2

    Senior Member
    Is it possible to say : Would she be (1) up (2) to the expectations ..., with (1) being the partitive and (2) the preposition?
    "be" is the verb to which we "hang" the partitive.
     

    nycphotography

    Senior Member
    American English
    James Stephens said:
    has brought us back to the question posed by clapac. I propose the following: Would she be (1) able to (2) live up to the expectations This gives as an answer two particles, no prepositions. We did however, have to add the verbs to hang the particles on. Whew! What a test!

    interestingly, rasing another question:

    Do we want TWO possible answers for a TWO SEPARATE sentences?

    Or one SET of TWO answers to make ONE SINGLE sentence?

    hum.
     
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