Would you mind if I opened the window?

Snappy_is_here

Senior Member
Japanese
"Would you mind if I opened the window?" is found for the usage of the word "mind" in Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English. The dictionary explains that it is spoken and used when making a polite request.In the same dictionary, "Would you mind if I open a window?" is also found for the usage of the word "mind."
Are these both acceptable and the same in meaning?
"Would you mind if I opened the window?"
"Would you mind if I open the window?"
 
  • Michel09

    Senior Member
    français - France
    They have the same meaning : being polite to someone when making a request. The only difference between the two is that the verb "open" is in a different form.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    'Would you mind if I opened the window?' is fine and normal. I was not sure about the second version, but on reflection, I think it's also possible, with no difference in meaning. I'm less likely to use that version. I tried to change the verb so that the difference is obvious:

    Would you mind if my son left early? :tick:
    Would you mind if my son leaves early? :tick:
    Would you mind if my son leave early? (subjunctive) :cross:
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I agree with natkretep.

    However, if you do a dictionary search for would you mind if I, you will find several threads on the construction, with varying opinions on whether the present (open) is acceptable.
     

    Lagrangepoint

    Senior Member
    English (UK)
    To borrow natkretep's example;
    I would use the present tense only with 'Do' and the past tense with 'Would' as follows:

    Do you mind if my son leaves early?
    Would you mind if my son left early?
     
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