Would you mind if...?

Mushypea

Member
English/ United Kingdom
Czesc,

I am plucking up the courage (with my very basic Polish) to try and talk to someone who is Polish. With the small amount I know, I thought I would try out the following but I don't think I've got it quite right.

Czy nie bedzie panu przeszkadzalo jesli rozmawie z pania? Ucze sie jezyka polskiego i potrzebuje swoja rada.

Would/do you mind if I talk with you? I am learning Polish and I need your advice.

If you can think of anything else (something similar) I could say to someone to start up a conversation I would be very grateful!

Dziekuje bardzo

Mushypea
 
  • Muminek

    New Member
    Polska, polszczyzna
    Czy mogłabym z Panem/ Panią porozmawiać? Uczę się języka polskiego i potrzebuję kilku rad.
     

    slavian1

    Member
    Poland, Polish
    Czy nie będzie panu pani przeszkadzało jeśli rozmawie porozmawiam z panią? Uczę się języka polskiego i potrzebuję swoja pani rady.

    Would/do you mind if I talk with you? I am learning Polish and I need your advice.

    The first sentence I would substitute for:
    Czy nie ma pani nic przeciwko, żebym z panią porozmawiał?
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Hi,

    I would add some minor points to Slavian1's corrections:
    Czy nie będzie Pani przeszkadzało jeśli porozmawiam z Panią po polsku? Uczę się języka polskiego i potrzebuję Pani rady.
    Since it is a request capitalisation is more than welcome. :)
    Without the po polsku part the sentence sounds incomplete to me.
    With these suggestions your version sounds very good.:thumbsup:

    You should also specify two things:
    --the sex of the person you want to talk to (the above version is addressed to a female);
    --your sex (the above version is uttered by a female, but Slavian1's is not).
     

    Mushypea

    Member
    English/ United Kingdom
    Thank you for all your advice! Thomas, you mentioned that Slavian1's sentence wasn't spoken by a female, what does 'Czy nie ma nic pani przeciwko, zebym z pania porozmawial?' mean exactly? Why is 'rady' spelled with a 'y' and not an 'a'? And what is the difference between rozmawiac and porozmawiac?

    Dziekuje

    Mushypea :)
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Hello Mushypea, :)

    Let me write the answer in your post:
    Thank you for all your advice! Thomas, you mentioned that Slavian1's sentence wasn't spoken by a female, what does 'Czy nie ma nic pani przeciwko, zebym z pania porozmawial?' mean exactly?
    Do you mind if I speak to you?
    it is uttered by a male to a female.
    Why is 'rady' spelled with a 'y' and not an 'a'?
    Because it is in a different case:
    rada is the nominative
    rady is (in this particular case) the accusative since the verb potrzebować requires this case, thus rada becomes rady.
    And what is the difference between rozmawiac and porozmawiac?
    Porozmawiać is the perfective counterpart of the imperfective rozmawiać. If you use rozmawiać then that suggests an incompleted talking; I think that as a perfective verb its present implications are too strong here and that's why it sounds/is wrong here.

    Porozmawiać sounds much better as it implies one conversation and we know it will finish sometime, you are asking someone whether the person will talk to you and not whether you are permitted to talk to them. This perfective verb is used to form future of rozmawiać.
    Would you mind if I talk to you?
    I talk refers to the future.
    Czy nie będzie Pani przeszkadzało jeśli porozmawiam z Panią po polsku?
    jeśli porozmawiam refers to the future, thus they are both equivalent in implications.
    Czy będzie Pani przeszkadzało jeśli rozmawiam z Panią.
    would mean Would you mind if I am talking to you now? You are asking if a person will oppose in the future (will mind) your talking to them in the present.
    Thus, jeśli rozmawiam refers to the present, no equivalence in implications.


    Dziekuje

    Mushypea :)

    Hope it helps. :)

    Tom
     

    slavian1

    Member
    Poland, Polish
    *You mean genitive (=dopełniacz, kogo czego) :confused:

    You are absolutely correct. "Potrzebować" requires genitive not accusative. :thumbsup:
    However, generally, very often one can hear someone saying: "Potrzebuję książkę" (accusative) instead of "Potrzebuję książki" (genitive)". - both mean "I need a book". According to Polish grammer - officially the second one is correct.
     

    JakubikF

    Senior Member
    I wouldn't use pani....I actually never use it, I just use Ty

    If you speak to a woman/man you don't know well or she/he is much older than you, it would be very impolite to say "Ty" instead of "Pan/Pani". This rule doesn't refer to chats and generally to the Internet (in fact you never know who you speak to). Nevertheless it would be obliged in more formal e-mails.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    If you speak to a woman/man you don't know well or she/he is much older than you, it would be very impolite to say "Ty" instead of "Pan/Pani". This rule doesn't refer to chats and generally to the Internet (in fact you never know who you speak to). Nevertheless it would be obliged in more formal e-mails.
    I would also add that it is also considered rude when you address a (wo)man you don't know who is your age or younger than you using Ty. This usually doesn't apply to people under, say, ~ 25.

    Tom
     

    Hal1fax

    Member
    Canada, English
    If you speak to a woman/man you don't know well or she/he is much older than you, it would be very impolite to say "Ty" instead of "Pan/Pani". This rule doesn't refer to chats and generally to the Internet (in fact you never know who you speak to). Nevertheless it would be obliged in more formal e-mails.

    I must have offended a lot of people then=P
     

    ryba

    Senior Member
    I must have offended a lot of people then=P

    Hahahah ;)

    "Potrzebować" requires genitive not accusative. :thumbsup:
    However, generally, very often one can hear someone saying: "Potrzebuję książkę" (accusative) instead of "Potrzebuję książki" (genitive)". - both mean "I need a book". According to Polish grammer - officially the second one is correct.

    It seems to me that I've just discovered something. :p

    The genitive case (with pomagać) is used with 1) abstract nouns (like advice in Mushypea's sentence) and 2) "uncountable" nouns (if sth like that exists in our language), like:

    1) I need help. = Potrzebuję pomocy. (kogo? czego?, Gen.)
    2) I need some water. = Potrzebuję (trochę) wody. (kogo? czego?, Gen.)

    BUT with other nouns it sounds quite off to say them in Genitive, i.e.:

    I need a book. = Potrzebuję książkę. (kogo? co?, Accusative)

    It seems to me (but I am far from being sure) that using Genetive in such cases changes the meaning a little bit:

    I need this hair dryer.=
    #1 ACCUSATIVE: Potrzebuję tę suszarkę. -> I need it and I need to take it. Sorry.
    #2 GENETIVE: Potrzebuję tej suszarki. -> I need to use it, I will give it back in a while.

    In many cases nouns in Acc. look the same as those in Gen., for ex:

    I need you. = Potrzebuję Cię/Ciebie.

    Now I have a question:

    I need her. = Potrzebuję ją. (Acc) or Potrzebuję jej (Gen). ?

    What do you think about all this?

    Pozdrawiam!!!
     

    slavian1

    Member
    Poland, Polish
    Hahahah ;)



    It seems to me that I've just discovered something. :p

    The genitive case (with pomagaæ) is used with 1) abstract nouns (like advice in Mushypea's sentence) and 2) "uncountable" nouns (if sth like that exists in our language), like:

    1) I need help. = Potrzebujê pomocy. (kogo? czego?, Gen.)
    2) I need some water. = Potrzebujê (trochê) wody. (kogo? czego?, Gen.)

    BUT with other nouns it sounds quite off to say them in Genitive, i.e.:

    I need a book. = Potrzebujê ksi¹¿kê. (kogo? co?, Accusative)

    According to the rules of Polish grammer 'potrzebowaæ' requires genitive, no matter whether a noun is abstract, "countable" or "uncountable".

    Check this: http://poradnia.pwn.pl/lista.php?szukaj=potrzebowa%E6&kat=18

    It seems to me (but I am far from being sure) that using Genetive in such cases changes the meaning a little bit:

    I need this hair dryer.=
    #1 ACCUSATIVE: Potrzebujê tê suszarkê. -> I need it and I need to take it. Sorry.
    #2 GENETIVE: Potrzebujê tej suszarki. -> I need to use it, I will give it back in a while.

    I dont't feel any difference. Both sentences sound fine to my ears and have exactly the same meaning (even though the first is incorrect).

    In many cases nouns in Acc. look the same as those in Gen., for ex:

    I need you. = Potrzebujê Ciê/Ciebie.

    Acc. = Gen. for masculine animate gender (apart from those ended with -a for example: mê¿czyzna.

    Pies: (gen.) psa, (acc) psa - a dog
    Ojciec: (gen.) ojca, (acc.) - ojca - a father
    but
    mê¿czyzna: (gen.) mê¿czyzny, (acc.) - mê¿czyznê - a man


    Now I have a question:

    I need her. = Potrzebujê j¹. (Acc) or Potrzebujê jej (Gen). ?

    What do you think about all this?

    I've asked my co-workers - 60% Potrzebujê j¹; 40% - Potrzebujê jej.
    According to my parents (who taought Polish language in high school) second version is proper.
     

    BezierCurve

    Senior Member
    #1 ACCUSATIVE: Potrzebujê tê suszarkê. -> I need it and I need to take it. Sorry.
    #2 GENETIVE: Potrzebujê tej suszarki. -> I need to use it, I will give it back in a while.

    Well... I'd say there is a slight difference between them in everyday Polish.

    The first one sounds somehow stronger, as if the speaker was focused more on the dryer itself. The second one indicates the speaker's focus just on using it.

    But this is the first time I noticed this difference at all.
     

    ryba

    Senior Member
    Well... I'd say there is a slight difference between them in everyday Polish.

    The first one sounds somehow stronger, as if the speaker was focused more on the dryer itself. The second one indicates the speaker's focus just on using it.

    But this is the first time I noticed this difference at all.
    It's cool to see someone else sees it the same way. Using Genetive indicates the partitive aspect of my need. I am wondering whether it is correct. Genetive is the standard noun case in negative sentences like Nie potrzebuję tej suszarki.

    Is there any official organ that we could write this question to? Pan Miodek? :D

    According to the rules of Polish grammer 'potrzebowaæ' requires genitive, no matter whether a noun is abstract, "countable" or "uncountable".

    Check this: http://poradnia.pwn.pl/lista.php?szukaj=potrzebowa%E6&kat=18
    So, it says:
    potrzebować

    Jak powinno się mówic: „Potrzebuję słownika” czy „Potrzebuję słownik”?
    Potrzebuje Pani słownika. - Mirosław Bańko, PWN
    And it seems similar to the DRYER case discussed above.

    Anyway, think I wouldn't say potrzebuję słownika. Potrzebuję (kogo? co?) słownik. Słownika reminds me of the old joke about Jasiu who says "Dzień dobry, poproszę gofera." (although, gramatically, both cases don't have much in common:D).

    I need her. = Potrzebuję ją. (Acc) or Potrzebuję jej (Gen). ?
    It seems to me that the first sentence refers to the woman as to a tool/object :/ while the second one, as a person.

    Potrzebuję człowieka. (Gen.).

    Potrzebuję jakiś przedmiot (Acc.), jakąś rzecz (Acc.).

    And also:

    Potrzebuję coś* abstrakcyjnego, jak: potrzebuję pomocy (Gen.), potrzebuję porady (Gen.).
    Potrzebuję coś* "niepoliczalnego", jak n.p.: potrzebuję wody (Gen.), cukru (Gen.).

    * Don't you think POTRZEBUJĘ COŚ (Acc.) would be used in neutral constatations (like in the sentences above) while POTRZEBUJĘ CZEGOŚ implies something more...?

    Examples: Właśnie coś takiego potrzebuję. (a statement)

    Właśnie czegoś takiego potrzebuję. (emphasizes my will to get it??? I don't know:confused:)

    What do you think? There must be some slight difference but I'm not sure if I'm right naming it.
     

    BezierCurve

    Senior Member
    You know, Ryba, it's just crossed my mind now that using Accusative here might be a result of a "shortcut" that we do when we want to say:

    Potrzebuję [użyć/ dostać/ wykorzystać -> Acc.] ten słownik.

    In colloquial speech we simply leave out "użyć/ dostać/ itp..." to make it easier. And the noun still stays in accusative, cause in fact we meant to say it in a slightly different way.

    Just a thought.

    PS. And I guess you were right, Phillio1972's girlfriend must've meant some old people around her, not just her own being "old" :)
     

    jazyk

    Senior Member
    Brazílie, portugalština
    Według mojej gramatyki polskiego czasownik potrzebować wymaga dopełniacza, więc zawsze go używam z tym prypadkiem, ale w moim polsko-angielskim słowniku brzmi, że ten czasownik akceptuje oba przypadki. Moim upodobaniem jest jednak dopełniacz.
     

    Oletta

    Senior Member
    ale w moim polsko-angielskim słowniku pisze/jest napisane*, że ten czasownik akceptuje oba przypadki. Moim upodobaniem jest jednak dopełniacz.

    Zdanie "moim upodobaniem jest jednak dopełniacz" jest całkowicie poprawne gramatycznie, jednak brzmi bardzo oficjalnie. Myślę, że bardziej naturalnie brzmiało by: "wolę jednak stosować dopełniacz" lub "wole go używać w dopełniaczu".

    Można stosować potrzebować w dopełniaczu:

    Potrzebuję więcej słońca. (potrzebować + rzeczownik w dopełniaczu)

    oraz w bierniku:

    "Potrzebuję [użyć/ dostać/ wykorzystać -> Acc.] ten słownik" (cyt. za BezierCurve) (potrzebować + czasownik + rzeczownik w bierniku)

    * prawidłowo "jest napisane", jednak potocznie "pisze".
     

    jazyk

    Senior Member
    Brazílie, portugalština
    To wiem, ale ponieważ Wy możecie używać potrzebować z biernikiem, i ja mogę używać chcieć z biernikiem. W końcu nie widzę różnicy. :p
     

    Oletta

    Senior Member
    To kwestia czasu gramatycznego.

    Czas teraźniejszy:

    To chcę.

    Czas przeszły.

    Tego chciałem.

    Analogicznie:

    To potrzebuję. (czas teraźniejszy)

    Tego potrzebowałem (czas przeszły)

    Lub, kiedy zmienisz szyk zdania.

    "To chcę" ale "chcę tego". "To potrzebuję" ale "Potrzebuję tego". W przypadku "chcieć" może być jeszcze "chcę to" lub "chciałem to" ale nie "to chciałem", chyba, że wskazujesz na przedmiot, którego chciałeś...
     

    .Jordi.

    Senior Member
    polonès
    To kwestia czasu gramatycznego.

    To nie jest kwestia czasu gramatycznego, lecz kwestia rekcji czasownika.

    ktoś chce coś (z rzeczownikiem konkretnym oznaczającym całość):
    Chcę tę, a nie tamtą książkę.
    Chce od niej płytę.


    ktoś chce czegoś
    (nie: coś) (z rzeczownikiem konkretnym oznaczającym część czegoś lub z rzeczownikiem abstrakcyjnym):
    Chciał chleba.
    Bezrobotni chcą pracy
    (nie: pracę).
    Chcesz ode mnie zapłaty?

    Ale: Czego albo co chcesz ode mnie?

    A zatem: Tego chciałem.
     

    Oletta

    Senior Member
    Dziękuję bardzo za poprawki. Była to próba dedukcji. Nie jestem polonistą. .Jordi. jest tutaj znawcą, więc nauczy/douczy i nas, Polaków :).

    PS....że wskazujesz na przedmiot, któregoy chciałeś... - tak, jak najbardziej.... jestem pod wpływem gwary śląskiej jak i innych języków... czasem mnie to przeraża, że moja polszczyzna, w tym wszystkim się pląta... najgorzej sobie radzę z tłumaczeniami na język polski, tak bardzo myślę wtedy w innym języku...
     

    .Jordi.

    Senior Member
    polonès
    Sarkazm z Twojej strony jest całkowicie nieuzasadniony, bo moim celem nie było urażenie kogokolwiek, a jedynie uchronienie osób, które nie władają językiem polskim tak dobrze jak Ty czy ja, od wyciągania błędnych wniosków. Tak czy owak, nie trzeba być filologiem, aby znać dobrze swój język. Czasami wystarczy słownik.
     

    slavian1

    Member
    Poland, Polish
    To kwestia czasu gramatycznego.

    Czas teraźniejszy:

    To chcę.

    Czas przeszły.

    Tego chciałem.

    Analogicznie:

    To potrzebuję. (czas teraźniejszy)

    Tego potrzebowałem (czas przeszły)

    Lub, kiedy zmienisz szyk zdania.

    "To chcę" ale "chcę tego". "To potrzebuję" ale "Potrzebuję tego". W przypadku "chcieć" może być jeszcze "chcę to" lub "chciałem to" ale nie "to chciałem", chyba, że wskazujesz na przedmiot, którego chciałeś...

    Could you please quote the source of your examples?

    I would never say : "To chcę" but "Tego chcę"
    I would never say : "To potrzebuję" but "Tego potrzebuję"
     

    Oletta

    Senior Member
    Zrozumiałeś mnie źle, nie miałam intencji sarkazmu. Podziękowałam Ci i w PS. napisałam refleksję nad tym, co się dzieje, z moim polskim kiedy uczę się wielu języków. Może ktoś ma podobnie do mnie i mnie rozumie. Znam np. kilku Anglików, u których taki proces zachodzi. Podziwiam obcokrajowców uczących się polskiego, takich jak np. jazyk.... skoro i my robimy błędy, np. ja.... Kalki językowe są wielka zmorą...
     

    Oletta

    Senior Member
    I would never say : "To chcę" but "Tego chcę"
    I would never say : "To potrzebuję" but "Tego potrzebuję"

    When you look at something and point to it, you can say: "tak, to chcę"... if it isn't correct in Polish, it is correct in the dialect. "To jest to, czego potrzebuję" in short "to potrzebuję" - when you point at some object, when it isn't an abstract noun. I might be wrong, it might be the influence of the Silesian dialect on my Polish.

    In a shop. A mother asks a child, they use informal language. There are plenty of things there. The mother is in a hurry and asks the child. "To chcesz?" And the child replies: "no dobra, to chcę". Is the context correctly Polish, then? Or is it typical of the dialect? Personally I don't think that the child would say: "tego chcę".
     

    slavian1

    Member
    Poland, Polish
    When you look at something and point to it, you can say: "tak, to chcę"... if it isn't correct in Polish, it is correct in the dialect. "To jest to, czego potrzebuję" in short "to potrzebuję" - when you point at some object, when it isn't an abstract noun. I might be wrong, it might be the influence of the Silesian dialect on my Polish.

    In a shop. A mother asks a child, they use informal language. There are plenty of things there. The mother is in a hurry and asks the child. "To chcesz?" And the child replies: "no dobra, to chcę". Is the context correctly Polish, then? Or is it typical of the dialect? Personally I don't think that the child would say: "tego chcę".

    I think, you have mixed up to verbs "potrzebować" (to need) and "checieć" (to want). You can say "To jest to, czego potrzebuję" but not "to potrzebuję" (you shoud say "tego potrzebuję").
    In case of the verb "chcieć" according to a context you can say "chcę to" or "chcę tego". As for your examples, there is something wrong with the word order. "To chcesz?" sounds odd but "Chcesz to?" is OK.
     

    Oletta

    Senior Member
    Yes, slavian1, you're right. But isn't it the same situation with "potrzebuję to" vs "to potrzebuję"?

    At first I had an idea that it has something to do with the tenses, but later it occurred to me that it is the matter of abstract nouns, in which case, even in a dialect, we have to say "tego potrzebuję", "tego chcę" or "potrzebuję tego", "chcę tego". But if it comes to the very nouns that we can touch, when we look at them and point to them we use both "to chcę" - with the emphasis on "to" (I want the very thing, not anything else), or "chcę to", and consequently "to potrzebuję" ("to" and not the other thing) or "potrzebuję to". (Example, in a tool shop - a tool - narzędzie is neutral in Polish. A man has a choice of a wide spectrum of tools. He has problems with making a decision but he choses. The shop assistant asks him if his decision is correct. Finally he says: "tak, to chcę, na pewno to" - or "chcę to, napewno to".)

    The deduction does not come from neither grammar books nor dictionaries. My observations might be wrong. I am just curious if any person, here at the forum, would agree. I asked some people from my region of Poland (Southern Poland), and for them the examples sound as natural as they sound for me.
     
    Top