Would you mind introducing a little bit about yourself

sunyaer

Senior Member
Chinese
"Would you mind introducing a little bit about yourself?"

I feel this is a natural and correct sentence, but would like native speakers to confirm.
 
  • djweaverbeaver

    Senior Member
    English Atlanta, GA USA
    Hi,

    We usually say something like the following: "Would you mind telling us a little bit about yourself?" Telling here implies introducing oneself.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    Oddly enough, at least in my opinion, if you change the word order a bit, it could work: Would you mind introducing yourself a little bit?

    But, that's not common. The original word order (#1) does not work.

    All that said, I recommend/support dj's (#2) suggestion.
     

    sunyaer

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    What about this in a project meeting with a new project engineer where the manager is speaking to him:

    "Do you want to start off by introducing a little bit about yourself?"
     
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    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    What about this in a project meeting with a new project engineer where the manager is speaking to him:

    "Do you want to start off by introducing a little bit about yourself?"
    The point is, Sunyaer, as others have pointed out, you are introducing yourself, not a statement about yourself.

    This is the obvious objection to the formula which you are suggesting and which I would press you to abandon.
     

    sunyaer

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    The point is, Sunyaer, as others have pointed out, you are introducing yourself, not a statement about yourself.
    I am introducing myself, and I can be introducing information (not neccessarily a statement) about myself.

    I found something on the internet that seems written by a good English speaker, if not a native one.

    Here is the source:

    http://homestars.com/forums/everything-else/topics/1061-100-percent-commission-free-drain-plumb-companies-what-you-should-know


    "Ok, lets start off by Introducing a bit about myself. I have been a plumber for a good 15 years now, completed george brown for my trade school learning and did my 9000hrs as per province of ontario requirements and challenged the mighty c of q. I worked hard labor in commercial plumbing, residential, and now Service plumbing in residential. In my service aspect of my career, I have worked for commission based companies and hourly “100% commission free” claim companies. Well I am here to tell you, that there is no difference! and no such thing as “100% commission free” and in most cases commission free is more expensive! Here is why:"


    Now, my feeling tells me that "introducing myself" is more common and logical, while "introducing information about myself" is also logical in some contexts.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    ... Now, my feeling tells me that "introducing myself" is more common and logical, while "introducing information about myself" is also logical in some contexts.
    The problem is that the verb "to introduce" has (at least) two meanings.

    One meaning is to tell someone something about a person: his or her name and perhaps more. In that usage, you only introduce a person. You cannot introduce information about a person.

    A second meaning is to put one thing into another thing. One can, for example, introduce a topic into a discussion, a chemical into a solution, or a control rod into a nuclear reactor core. In that context, you could introduce information about yourself into a book. Therefore, "introduce information about myself" is (as you wrote) correct in some contexts, but those contexts are not the context of someone introducing himself at a meeting.

    In the context that you provided in post #4, only "introduce yourself" is correct. "Introduce information about yourself" is an error. The manager may have made this error because he or she remembers a sentence in which the word "introduce" is used with its other meaning, and does not understand that the two meanings are different.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    In the context of my post #6, is the sentence "Ok, lets start off by Introducing a bit about myself...." natural?
    Several of us have told you that we don't think it's idiomatic. I haven't changed my view about this. If I were you, I'd avoid saying this.

    Why not say 'saying a bit about myself'?
     
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    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    In the context of my post #6, is the sentence "Ok, lets start off by Introducing a bit about myself...." natural?
    Again, no. That is not the correct way to say it in the context of a meeting. In that context, you do not introduce anything about yourself: not information, not "a bit," nothing. You introduce yourself. That is all.
     

    Franco-filly

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England
    "Would you mind introducing a little bit about yourself?"
    As others have stated, it does not sound natural. You could say "Would you mind introducing yourself and telling us a little about yourself?" To which one might reply, for example: "Yes, hello, my name is Sunyaer, and I live in China and have been learning English for 2 years"
     
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