Would you mind leaving

Imladris

Senior Member
Turkey - Turkish
[1] Would you mind leaving the patient's bedside for a few minutes? I'll give him an injection.
[2] Would you mind if you left the patient's bedside for a few minutes? I'll give him an injection.

I know 1 is correct, but I wonder whether 2 is also used.
 
  • Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    [1] Would you mind leaving the patient's bedside for a few minutes? I'll give him an injection.
    [2] Would you mind if you left the patient's bedside for a few minutes? I'll give him an injection.

    I know 1 is correct, but I wonder whether 2 is also used.
    2. is correct but sounds a little forced in the context, which is quite casual.

    On a more formal occasion that formula would be entirely appropriate: Would you mind if we held the Christmas party in office time?
     

    Basil Ganglia

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    To my ear, the second request is simply a more softened version of the first request and is perfectly fine.

    Note that in either case it would be more natural to convert "I'll give him an injection" to a dependent clause and attach it to the first sentence.
    "Would you mind leaving the patient's bedside for a few minutes while I give him an injection?"
    Or
    "Would you mind leaving the patient's bedside for a few minutes because I'm going to give him an injection?"
     
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