wrap up in the blanket

WildWest

Senior Member
Turkish
"Feeling very cold, she wrapped herself up in the blanket"

Hi there. Can someone explain to me why the word "in" is used up there? I thought it had to be "with", or at least "by". Maybe even "through".
 
  • Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Because in English that's how we say it. We wrap things, or people, in whatever we're wrapping around them, not some other preposition.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    That's perfectly normal. If somebody or something is wrapped up in a blanket, he, she or it is surrounded by blanket - so in the blanket. A parcel can be wrapped in brown paper, a baby may be wrapped in swaddling clothes, and you can tell a child to "wrap up nice and warm in your new coat".
     

    Hildy1

    Senior Member
    English - US and Canada
    Prepositions can drive us crazy, but in this case, as Andygc says, "in" makes sense. Think of the person as being inside the blanket, just as we are in (inside) a house. The blanket is around the person, as the house is around us.
     

    WildWest

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Prepositions can drive us crazy, but in this case, as Andygc says, "in" makes sense. Think of the person as being inside the blanket, just as we are in (inside) a house. The blanket is around the person, as the house is around us.
    Thanks, Hildy1. Your explanation made sense to me somehow. Comparing it to a house covering us kind of worked, however I'm still afraid of facing to some other phrasal verbs where these kinds of adjectives are used.
     

    rituparnahoymoy

    Senior Member
    Assamese -India
    Is it neccessary to use "up" here?

    "Feeling very cold, she wrapped herself up in the blanket"

    Wrapped herself in a blanket. Does it sound correct?
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    The "up" is not necessary, but adds an idea of totality or completeness. Compare this with being "tied" vs. "tied up" by robbers, or "sewing" vs. "sewing up" a tear in a piece of cloth.
     
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