wraps

mimi2

Senior Member
vietnam vietnamese
“Arranging some persons to keep the party moving smoothly:
Greeting guests, disposing of wraps, answering telephone calls, introducing guests, etc..
Please help me with two points:
-The usage of the verb “move” => moving smoothly. Can "move" be used for “party”?
-The word “wraps” => dispose wraps. What does it mean in this context?
Thanks.
 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    it probably means that whatever was on the programme is continuing without interruption.

    A "wrap" means outer coats, jackets, etc. that guests would remove at the door.

    My grandmother used the term. I haven't heard it recently.
     

    mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    Hi, sdgraham.
    Thank you very much.
    You said your grandmother used it? It means that this word is no longer used. :(
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I can't say that it's not used at all, since it might persist in the U.K. or some areas of the U.S. - or in some elevated social stratum.
     

    camaysar

    Senior Member
    usa
    usa, english
    Hi Mimi,

    I would say that “Arranging some persons to keep the party moving smoothly" means that certain people are chosen to be (sit) together who will likely find each other interesting, to keep everyone involved and entertained.

    Hope this helps!
     

    Phred

    Member
    U.S.A English
    There's always the phrase "under wraps", meaning that something (an operation or a plan a majority of the time) is meant to be kept a secret.
     

    camaysar

    Senior Member
    usa
    usa, english
    I'm sure wraps is still used for outer clothing. But it is a formal usage, as on a printed sign or announcement. I do believe it is more written than spoken.
     

    Joelline

    Senior Member
    American English
    I think you're right, camaysar. The one expression I'm fairly sure I've never heard is "Wrap up! The evening might be cold!" In my part of the US, we would say, "Bundle up! The evening might be cold."
     

    camaysar

    Senior Member
    usa
    usa, english
    Yes, Joelline, definitely "bundle up" over "wrap up", which has more the connotation of finishing something.. "it's time to wrap it up."
     
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