wring-wrung-wrung

oh_seoul

Member
Korea
There was Kokua on the floor, the lamp at her side, before her was a milk-white bottle, with a round belly and a long neck; and as she viewed it, Kokua wrong her hands.

It's from "The Bottle Imp" by R.L. Stevenson.

Isn't the above 'wrong' a mistype of wrung ?

Or it used to be 'wrong' in old days since the novel was written in 1891.

Or any other meaning that's beyond my understanding?

I thought of idiom "wring one's hands".
 
  • Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Yes, it's a misprint, and "wrong" has never been used as the simple past of "wring". There are several versions of the story accessible through Google Books and all but one have the correct text "wrung".
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    It's just a transcription error, and it should be "wrung" - the simple past tense of the verb "to wring". At one time the alternative "wrang" was used, but not, as far as I'm aware, "wrong".

    [cross-posted with Andy]
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I have no doubt that it's either a transcription error or the optical character recognition software getting it wrong.

    However, the OED does indicate that wrong(e) was a possible spelling in the 16th century and before that, eg

    1596 Spenser View State Ireland in Wks. (Globe) 620 How hardly that Act of Parliament was wronge out of them.

     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    and "wrong" has never been used as the simple past of "wring"
    Yes, I stand corrected and should have checked. How about - and "wrong" has not been used as the simple past of "wring" for at least 500 years. :oops:

    It's a typesetting error. There is one edition of a book containing the story, with this error, visible on Google Books.
     

    oh_seoul

    Member
    Korea
    Than
    Yes, it's a misprint, and "wrong" has never been used as the simple past of "wring". There are several versions of the story accessible through Google Books and all but one have the correct text "wrung".
    Thank you so much!
     

    oh_seoul

    Member
    Korea
    I have no doubt that it's either a transcription error or the optical character recognition software getting it wrong.

    However, the OED does indicate that wrong(e) was a possible spelling in the 16th century and before that, eg

    1596 Spenser View State Ireland in Wks. (Globe) 620 How hardly that Act of Parliament was wronge out of them.
    Thank you so much!
     

    Winstanley808

    Banned
    English - U.S.
    English has a large class of strong verbs (as strong verbs go nowadays in English) with the pattern i-a-u for the vowel of the present, the past or preterite, and the past participle: sink-sank-sunk, swim-swam-swum, etc. They include what bells do or we do to them, ring-rang-rung. In some of these, the "a" for the past has become a "u," so the pattern is i-u-u; wring is one of the these. In some cases, the transition is still going on, so that we have shrink-shrank-shrunk alongside shrink-shrunk-shrunk. There is a verb class with i as the vowel in the present and o in the past, but the pattern is (or was; some of these are obsolete or have become weak verbs) i-o-i. The comparable verbs in German also have i-a-u for the three "principle parts." You have to learn whether a particular member of this group has a or u as the vowel in the past tense, but in modern English none of them have o.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top