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Lun-14

Banned
Hindi
Hi Dear teachers

Her friend wrote a very funny English word in the comment box on her Facebook's post.
Her friend wrote down a very funny English word in the comment box on her Facebook's post.
What is the difference if I use 'write down' instead using simply 'write'?

Can you please explain to me where I can use 'write down'?

Thank you for your suggestions,

Lun-14
 
  • Lun-14

    Banned
    Hindi
    Thank you ... Dermott.
    You know we also write something on paper, then what will be the difference between simple write and write down?
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    The difference is that we use either phrase (write/write down) for writing with a pen on paper. But we would not use "write down" for typing things on a computer - that isn't "writing something down".
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    I think "write" is correct, strictly speaking, for creating any text document on a computer (even a forum or facebook post). It is meaning 2 in the WR dictionary (meaning 1 is the pen and paper meaning).
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    To write - to create text by writing in any manner.
    To write down - to copy writing onto a surface; to write on a surface. Usually only used with a writing implement (pen, pencil, chalk, etc.)

    You will see that it is possible for the meanings to overlap.

    Her friend wrote a very funny English word in the comment box on her Facebook's post. -> she type it in Facebook as a comment.
    Her friend wrote down a very funny English word in the comment box on her Facebook's post. -> she copied a very funny English word in the comment box onto a piece of paper.

    A: "I saw a good tip on WRF yesterday, so I wrote it down. Here! I'll show you it." [Hands the piece of paper to the listener, who then reads it.]

    There are several words that are normally prepositions (up, down, out, etc) that are used as adverbs. They usually have the function of emphasising the verb and/or adding a nuance of completeness and/or giving a slight distinction in meaning to a verb.

    As you progress in English and hear and read these uses, it will become clearer. Advice on each separate usage is difficult to give as the context is required in each case.
     

    Lun-14

    Banned
    Hindi
    Thank you so much for your clearer explanation PaulQ:)

    to copy writing onto a surface
    she copied a very funny English word in the comment box onto a piece of paper.
    One clarification please: Does this meaning involves copying action only (copying a text, whether it's from a computer or from a paper or a whiteboard) or does it involves both copying and pasting actions?

    i.e,

    Bill wrote down an English word = Bill copied an English word from computer, piece of paper or from any other source.

    Bill wrote down an English word = Bill copied an English word from computer, piece of paper or from any other source and then pasted it on another computer, piece of paper etc.
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Writing something down does not imply copying anything, apart from a mental image inside your brain. :)

    We only use paste in the context of a computer program in the sense of copy.
     

    Lun-14

    Banned
    Hindi
    I'm still waiting for Mr. PaulQ to explain the meaning thus clear up the confusion stated in 8.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    To write down - to copy writing onto a surface; to write on a surface. Usually only used with a writing implement (pen, pencil, chalk, etc.)
    to write on a surface -> to write on a piece of paper, a wall, a blackboard, a noticeboard, etc.
    Bill wrote down an English word = Bill copied an English word from computer, piece of paper or from any other source.
    :thumbsup:

    e2efour writes in #9 "Writing something down does not imply copying anything, apart from a mental image inside your brain."

    I would say that although this might be true, it is not particularly helpful. I am addressing why we say "I wrote it down" instead of "I wrote it." and why the implied concept of "down" means that the writing is on a surface is important.

    Compare:
    I knew I would forget it, so I wrote your telephone number. :cross:
    I knew I would forget it, so I wrote down your telephone number. :tick:
    I knew I would forget it, so I wrote your telephone number on a piece of paper. :tick:
    I knew I would forget it, so I wrote down your telephone number on a piece of paper. :tick:

    This shows why "To write down - to copy writing onto a surface; to write on a surface." is the meaning the student needs to grasp.

    Lun-14,
    This is what I said in #8 above:

    You will see that it is possible for the meanings to overlap. <- this is important!

    Her friend wrote a very funny English word in the comment box on her Facebook's post. -> she type it in Facebook as a comment.
    Her friend wrote down a very funny English word in the comment box on her Facebook's post. -> she copied a very funny English word in the comment box onto a piece of paper. <- this is my disagreement with e2efour: you can copy/write down anything from any source.

    A: "I saw a good tip on WRF yesterday, so I wrote it down. Here! I'll show you it." [Hands the piece of paper to the listener, who then reads it.]

    There are several words that are normally prepositions (up, down, out, etc) that are used as adverbs. They usually have the function of emphasising the verb and/or adding a nuance of completeness and/or giving a slight distinction in meaning to a verb.

    As you progress in English and hear and read these uses, it will become clearer. Advice on each separate usage is difficult to give as the context is required in each case.
     
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