Writing numbers under 10

  • Can you please tell me if one always has to write numbers out in words if under ten, even in legal contracts for example?




    Hi Esperanza2,

    I don't know is there is a hard and fast rule about the first part of your question but I would say "yes" in formal writing.

    In legal contracts all numbers have to be written down as numerals and words.

    "This tenancy is for a term of 6 (six) calendar months."






    LRV
     

    roxcyn

    Senior Member
    USA
    American English [AmE]
    Most of the time they will put the numeral number and then write it out in parenthesis like the above example :)
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Hi Esperanza2,

    I don't know is there is a hard and fast rule about the first part of your question but I would say "yes" in formal writing.

    In legal contracts all numbers have to be written down as numerals and words.

    "This tenancy is for a term of 6 (six) calendar months."

    LRV

    Absolutely but if I send a covering letter forwarding the legal document for review, I might refer to nine changes in paragraph X and 20 changes in paragraph Y so Esperanza22 and I learned the same rule. :)
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    There are different conventions in different contexts.
    In my particular context, one to ten are words, 11 and upwards are numerals.

    In legal and financial documents it would not be unusual to see the numerals and the words - 365 (three hundred and sixty five) ...
     

    equivoque

    Senior Member
    Australia - English
    I was a legal secretary and the words in parenthesis, following the numerals, were always required. I suppose it's to cover for typo's and prevent more litigation.
     
    I was a legal secretary and the words in parenthesis, following the numerals, were always required. I suppose it's to cover for typo's and prevent more litigation.



    I was, too, for a short time. This requirement arose in the days when legal documents were hand-written and numerals might be difficult to decipher, or misinterpreted.

    The same rule applies when writing cheques. Numerals in the space on the right hand side, and words on the lines below. This is to prevent the recipient altering the sum (numerals) to his advantage.

    "Pay R.J. Robertson the sum of £20.00 (twenty pounds only).






    LRV
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    I was a legal secretary and the words in parenthesis, following the numerals, were always required. I suppose it's to cover for typo's and prevent more litigation.

    I am a real estate paralegal in law firms doing strictly real estate and mortgage transactions and it is still an absolute imperative to place the numbers with the words ie. "One Hundred Thousand ($100,000.00) Dollars" in all manner of real estate documents.
     
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