writing street numbers

R@resh

Member
Romanian
How do people write the numbers associated with the street in the anglophone world? I can't decide between:

Cambridge Street number 5
5 Cambridge Street
5th Cambridge Street
or alternatively Cambridge Street 5th

What do you think?
 
  • User With No Name

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Same in the U.S.

    ADDED FYI: Also, in case you were wondering, ordinals like 5th in U.S. addresses typically refer to numbered streets. So "123 5th Street" would be a typical address, referring to the house numbered 123 on "Fifth Street."
     
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    R@resh

    Member
    Romanian
    Same in the U.S.

    ADDED FYI: Also, in case you were wondering, ordinals like 5th in U.S. addresses typically refer to numbered streets. So "123 5th Street" would be a typical address, referring to the house numbered 123 on "Fifth Street."


    Yes, my question was about the numbered Streets. But I can't make up my mind without an exact example.

    " 345 5th Cambridge street"
    Is this a good example?

    Or "345 5th Cambridge"?
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    Streets in the US are not called "5th Cambridge St." They're either "Cambridge Street" or "Fifth Street."
    345 Cambridge Street
    and
    345 Fifth Street
    are typical addresses in the US.

    In some cities and towns, it's customary to leave out 'Street' in an address when it's written informally: 345 Shadyside instead of 345 Shadyside Street.
     

    R@resh

    Member
    Romanian
    Streets in the US are not called "5th Cambridge St." They're either "Cambridge Street" or "Fifth Street."
    345 Cambridge Street
    and
    345 Fifth Street
    are typical addresses in the US.

    In some cities and towns, it's customary to leave out 'Street' in an address when it's written informally: 345 Shadyside instead of 345 Shadyside Street.

    Thanks for clarifying.
     

    R@resh

    Member
    Romanian
    Yes, in both countries it's the house number, then the name of the street.

    5 Cambridge Street
    5 Fifth Street

    I see. But I want to write the number of the street, because in my country streets are numbered. should I write

    5th Cambridge Street
    Or
    Cambridge Street number 5?
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I see. But I want to write the number of the street, because in my country streets are numbered. should I write

    5th Cambridge Street
    Or
    Cambridge Street number 5?
    You were asking about the "Anglophone" world, not your home country.
    In your question, are there 5 different streets whose name is Cambridge Street?
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Yes. There are 5 different Cambridge streets. How do I write down the fifth street?
    That doesn't happen (to my knowledge) in Anglophone countries so we don't have a convention (or need) on how to do it! One way might be "23 Cambridge Street #5" but it would be confused with unit/apartment/flat #5 in that house, so it wouldn't work.
     

    R@resh

    Member
    Romanian
    That doesn't happen (to my knowledge) in Anglophone countries so we don't have a convention (or need) on how to do it! One way might be "23 Cambridge Street #5" but it would be confused with unit/apartment/flat #5 in that house, so it wouldn't work.

    I see. Thank you anyway. Best regards.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I think that if there were two different Cambridge Streets in the same town, then
    - in written addresses they would be differentiated by their postcodes
    - in speech, they'd be differentiated by describing them as "Cambridge Street off Oxford Road" or "Cambridge Street at the bottom of town" or something similar.
     

    Delvo

    Senior Member
    American English
    I would try either putting the parts that could be mixed up with other on different lines or adding punctuation to separate them:

    678
    5th Cambridge Street
    Wherever City, State, postal area #

    or

    678, 5th-Cambridge Street, Wherever City...

    It's not conventional, but nothing else is either, and I think people would figure it out that way.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I would try either putting the parts that could be mixed up with other on different lines or adding punctuation to separate them:

    678
    5th Cambridge Street
    Wherever City, State, postal area #

    or

    678, 5th-Cambridge Street, Wherever City...

    It's not conventional, but nothing else is either, and I think people would figure it out that way.
    If such a situation really existed, the locals would have come up with a solution :)
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    In the U.S., two streets in the same town don't have exactly the same name. We distinguish different streets by the second part. Atlanta is one city famous for this.

    There are are streets called:

    Peachtree Street
    Peachtree Road
    Peachtree Boulevard
    Peachtree Place
    Peachtree Circle
    Peachtree Lane

    Etc.

    There are many. But all the names are slightly different.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    You will have realised that in the English-speaking world, the convention of using both name and number for a street is not known. I will say that I am aware of this system in some parts of Malaysia, as seen here:
    1664839450988.png

    ('Jalan' is 'road' in Malay, and 'Taban' is a kind of tree.) You will see addresses like 15 Jalan Taban 4.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    There are 5 different Cambridge streets. How do I write down the fifth street?
    I always think that it is a mistake to try to copy the style of, for example, UK addresses when referring to a foreign address. The foreign style should be used.

    I say this as, if I send a letter to Romania, the person who wants to read the address is the local postman - it helps him if the address is in a style that he understands.

    In Germany the address system is

    Herr Schmidt
    5000 Köln 41
    Luxemburger Strasse 276

    The same address in the English system is

    Mr Smith
    276 Luxemburger Street
    5000 Cologne 41
     

    R@resh

    Member
    Romanian
    I always think that it is a mistake to try to copy the style of, for example, UK addresses when referring to a foreign address. The foreign style should be used.

    I say this as, if I send a letter to Romania, the person who wants to read the address is the local postman - it helps him if the address is in a style that he understands.

    In Germany the address system is

    Herr Schmidt
    5000 Köln 41
    Luxemburger Strasse 276

    The same address in the English system is

    Mr Smith
    276 Luxemburger Street
    5000 Cologne 41

    The thing is, I had to send it to some english speakers. The name of the street is "Lupu" and it is the 130th street. How should I have written it for them to understand?
     

    djmc

    Senior Member
    English - United Kingdom
    It doesn't matter if the letter is sent to English speakers. The address should be in the format used locally as PaulQ has explained. If you are sending a letter abroad use the format used there, one shouldn't try to assimilate to either the UK format or any other.
     

    R@resh

    Member
    Romanian
    It doesn't matter if the letter is sent to English speakers. The address should be in the format used locally as PaulQ has explained. If you are sending a letter abroad use the format used there, one shouldn't try to assimilate to either the UK format or any other.

    There are 130 streets in this country that are called "Lupu" and this one is the 130th. How can I write it down for him to understand whitout excluding the numbering of the street because it is important?
     

    AutumnOwl

    Senior Member
    Swedish, Finnish
    Do you mean how to write a return address on a letter that is yo be sent back to you? Then write the address exactly how you want the recipient to write it on the envelope, the way you would expect a person living in Romania to write it, as it's a postal worker in Romania who has to understand the address and to see that you get the letter. I have had snail mail penpals in many countries, including Romania, and I have always wrote their address exactly the way they did, as I understood as that is how an address was written in their country.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    The name of the street is "Lupu" and it is the 130th street. How should I have written it for them to understand?
    I've looked at Google Earth for Romania. Lupu Street is a relatively common name but the examples given are distinguished by a postcode/zip code (and the name of the district or town), e.g.

    Strada Vasile Lupu 23,
    Ploiești 100010,
    Romania

    Strada Vasile Lupu 23,
    Tunari 077180,
    Romania

    Strada Vasile Lupu 30A,
    Brașov 500064,
    Romania

    So you explain this by adding an explanation.

    Strada Vasile Lupu (Street Name) 30A (House number),
    Brașov (town or district) 500064 (postcode/zip code),
    Romania (Country.)
     

    R@resh

    Member
    Romanian
    I've looked at Google Earth for Romania. Lupu Street is a relatively common name but the examples given are distinguished by a postcode/zip code (and the name of the district or town), e.g.

    Strada Vasile Lupu 23,
    Ploiești 100010,
    Romania

    Strada Vasile Lupu 23,
    Tunari 077180,
    Romania

    Strada Vasile Lupu (Street Name) 30A (House number)

    Ok, I will do as you say.

    However, 30A is not the house number, but the street number. I am telling you the way addresses are displayed here is different.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Yes, the way the address is displayed can be different. In Europe the house number often comes after the street name. Your address should be written in exactly the same way as it is written in your country.
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    According to Google Street View, Strada Vasile Lupu 56 in Ploieşti is a couple of houses away from Strada Vasile Lupu 50 in Ploieşti. The two houses are on the same street in the same city.
    In American English, 56 and 50 in those addresses are house numbers. They're the numbers assigned to individual houses on that street.
     

    R@resh

    Member
    Romanian
    According to Google Street View, Strada Vasile Lupu 56 in Ploieşti is a couple of houses away from Strada Vasile Lupu 50 in Ploieşti. The two houses are on the same street in the same city.
    In American English, 56 and 50 in those addresses are house numbers. They're the numbers assigned to individual houses on that street.

    Well maybe that's how google displays them for non natives.

    I live on Lirei street number 4, Block L1, Apartment number 81. The Block which I live in doesn't have a number. On papers all blocks are in alfabetical order only.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I'm looking at Constanța in the www.openstreetmap.org
    1664892247274.png

    I can see two Strada Lirei, but they are not numbered, but they are unconnected - one in the north, and one parallel to it in the south, and there are other parallel streets that seem to be unnamed. Are you saying that these are numbered locally?
     

    R@resh

    Member
    Romanian
    I'm looking at Constanța in the www.openstreetmap.org
    View attachment 77336
    I can see two Strada Lirei, but they are not numbered, but they are unconnected - one in the north, and one parallel to it in the south, and there are other parallel streets that seem to be unnamed. Are you saying that these are numbered locally?

    Yes. And this is what everyone refuses to accept. Most streets in Romania are numbered. I even gave my own address, well sort of 😉.

    But some people here believe they know better. I just wanted to know an acceptable way of writting streets and their numbers.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Yes. And this is what everyone refuses to accept. Most streets in Romania are numbered. I even gave my own address, well sort of 😉.

    But some people here believe they know better. I just wanted to know an acceptable way of writting streets and their numbers.
    It's not a question of "knowing better". The way addresses are written is specific to each country. To write a Romanian address in the same format as, say, one in the UK, just doesn't make sense - if I wanted to send a letter to you in Romanina, I would use the format appropriate for Romania, not for the UK. It's the concept that is strange, not people's reactions to it!
     

    R@resh

    Member
    Romanian
    An interesting discussion from a foreigner living in Romania for a while, trying to decode address information. It seems to be a bit more complicated than we thought :eek:

    Yes. All that information -including the street number- is vital.
     
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    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    In the essay on addresses that JulianStuart posted just now, the person writing says
    "Line 1:
    If you are sending mail you would start with the person you’re sending it to. It’s not required as far as I can tell but on most of the mail I get the names are in all capital letters.

    Line 2:
    On the next line, put the street, with the type of street, then the name (Str. Iugoslaviei—Street/Strada Iugoslaviei—not Iugoslaviei Str.). Then comes the house/building number (not the other way around, as you do in the U.S.) and…

    Here’s where the fun and the series of incomprehensible numbers come.
    If you are sending something to a stand-alone house, you’re done."

    This is what I was talking about earlier (#28): Type of street, name of street, house/building number for a free-standing house.
    Is that wrong for a free-standing house, @R@resh?
     

    R@resh

    Member
    Romanian
    In the essay on addresses that JulianStuart posted just now, the person writing says
    "Line 1:
    If you are sending mail you would start with the person you’re sending it to. It’s not required as far as I can tell but on most of the mail I get the names are in all capital letters.

    Line 2:
    On the next line, put the street, with the type of street, then the name (Str. Iugoslaviei—Street/Strada Iugoslaviei—not Iugoslaviei Str.). Then comes the house/building number (not the other way around, as you do in the U.S.) and…

    Here’s where the fun and the series of incomprehensible numbers come.
    If you are sending something to a stand-alone house, you’re done."

    This is what I was talking about earlier (#28): Type of street, name of street, house/building number for a free-standing house.
    Is that wrong for a free-standing house, @R@resh?

    What you said is correct. Every house has a number associated with it. It's just that most streets here have a number associated with them and you can't find all of these numbers on google maps.
     
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    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    What you said is correct. Every house has a number associated with it. It's just that most streets here have a number associated with it and you can't find all of these numbers on google maps.
    If such a situation really existed, the locals would have come up with a solution :)
    In Japan, there frequently is not even a street number or name! But the post office there has a solution: two defined formats - one for using Japanese characters and another for using Romaji/Roman characters for letters from people who don't read/write Japanese.

    If you want someone from outside Romania to send you a letter I would strongly recommend sending them the information in the format exactly as you would write it yourself - don't try to "Anglicize" it - you will confuse the Romanian postal system and person who will actually try to deliver the letter.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    In the US, it's much simpler. Street name, house number. That's it. Every street name is different and unique.

    1165 Oak Drive
    1165 Oak Terrace

    (Two different streets, two different houses, no number except the house number)

    This is a third house:

    1169 Oak Drive

    We don't need anything more complicated. So asking how we do something that we don't do is doing to be a dead end. Every house only has those two things. If you live in an apartment there will be one more thing - the apartment number.

    So an apartment address might be:

    1250 Maple St. Apt 12
     
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    R@resh

    Member
    Romanian
    In Japan, there frequently is not even a street number or name! But the post office there has a solution: two defined formats - one for using Japanese characters and another for using Romaji/Roman characters for letters from people who don't read/write Japanese.

    If you want someone from outside Romania to send you a letter I would strongly recommend sending them the information in the format exactly as you would write it yourself - don't try to "Anglicize" it - you will confuse the Romanian postal system and person who will actually try to deliver the letter.

    That's actually really cool to know. I always admired the japanese way of handling things.
     

    R@resh

    Member
    Romanian
    In the US, it's much simpler. Street name, house number. That's it. Every street name is different and unique.

    1165 Oak Drive
    1165 Oak Terrace

    (Two different streets, two different houses, no number except the house number)

    This is a third house:

    1169 Oak Drive

    We don't need anything more complicated. So asking how we do something that we don't do is doing to be a dead end. Every house only has those two things. If you live in an apartment there will be one more thing - the apartment number.

    So an apartment address might be:

    1250 Maple St. Apt 12

    I remember scrolling on google maps and finding out a street in America called "This street", and right next to it "That street" and "Another street". :) So I guess you're right about americans not needing complicated things.
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    I remember scrolling on google maps and finding out a street in America called "This street", and right next to it "That street" and "Another street". :) So I guess you're right about americans not needing complicated things.
    Those streets are actually in Porters Lake, Nova Scotia, Canada.
     

    Delvo

    Senior Member
    American English
    There is one other little complication with American street names on the subject of duplication. We often have a particular street running through the middle of a city which acts like a mirror for addresses. The numbering system treats that street as #0, so the numbers increase with distance away from there in opposite directions. Other streets on opposite sides of the mirror street can have the same name, except that they have a North, South, East, or West added. It's usually (but not always) actually the same street, but, when it crosses the mirror street, its name changes from North Rockefeller Avenue to South Rockefeller Avenue, for example. These often get abbreviated with just N, S, E, or W. And there can be two mirror streets in the same city, one north-south and one east-west. Near my home, there's also a single pair of streets along both banks of a creek, named North Ellicott Creek Road and South Ellicott Creek Road.
     
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