Y a dormir

kinai

Senior Member
Spain Spanish
Hi.

I need help to translate a sentence. It is supposed a mother talking with her baby. The sentence is:
Y ahora un pañal (nuevo), y a dormir.
I translated it as:
An now a (new) diaper, and to sleep/bed.

The thing is, would this be the way to say it or is there any other way to say it? Mainly to show that is a mother talking with a baby.

Thanks.
 
  • LVRBC

    Senior Member
    English-US, standard and medical
    "And so to bed" sounds literary. Stick with Bevj's "and off to bed," or something like "off to sleepy-byes."
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    A clean nappy and off to bed!
    (Diaper se usa en AE, nappy en BrE)
    :thumbsup: Suena muy natural, pero también se puede decir "A clean diaper and then it's time for bed/sleep!" Para expresar la idea de "a {infinitivo}," es muy habitual decir "it's time to/for..." Por ejemplo, "a comer" se traduce como "it's time to eat."
     

    Cerros de Úbeda

    Senior Member
    UK
    Spanish - Spain (Galicia)
    "And so to bed" sounds literary. Stick with Bevj's "and off to bed," or something like "off to sleepy-byes."
    You're quite right...

    It surprised me, when I checked it on Google, to find only references to it in relation to Samuel Pepys - apparently, how he sounded off on his famous diary.

    I would have thought I knew it from a colloquial setting, but it must have come from the press.


    This 'off to sleepy-byes', is it used just with children, or is it used in general? I love it.
     
    Last edited:

    LVRBC

    Senior Member
    English-US, standard and medical
    "Sleepy-byes" is used only with small children. The OP asked for language that would indicate a mother addressing her baby.
     
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