Y a-t-il

  • Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    johndoe3344 said:
    What does that phrase mean?

    The context is:

    Y a-t-il un domaine public de l'Internet?

    Thanks.



    It's just the inversion of "il y a" (there is/are) plus an extra "t" to make it pronounceable. ;) Your sentence in English would be:

    Is there an Internet public domain? (hardly context :confused: )
     

    Cath.S.

    Senior Member
    français de France
    Very good explanation, Daniel. :thumbsup:
    Context is not really important here, as y a-t-il can only have one meaning in French.
    Enjoy those types of words, they are rarer than a vegetarian vampire. ;)
     

    lainyn

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    N'oublie pas que l'ordre correct des adjectifs anglais serait d'abord "public" et puis "Internet" et que la phrase "Y-a-t-il..." peut dire aussi "Are there..." si le nom qui suit (qui est vraiment le sujet de la phrase) est plural.

    Don't forget that the proper order of English adjectives would be "Is there a public Internet domain?" and that "Y-a-t-il.." can also mean "Are there" if the noun to follow (which is actually the subject) is plural.

    Amicalement,
    ~Natasha


    S'il vous plait, corrigez-moi (mes fautes de français)
     

    OlivierG

    Senior Member
    France / Français
    lainyn said:
    N'oublie pas que l'ordre correct des adjectifs anglais serait d'abord "public" et puis "Internet" et que la phrase "Y-a-t-il..." peut dire aussi "Are there..." si le nom qui suit (qui est vraiment le sujet de la phrase) est plural.

    Don't forget that the proper order of English adjectives would be "Is there a public Internet domain?" and that "Y-a-t-il.." can also mean "Are there" if the noun to follow (which is actually the subject) is plural.
    I'm really not sure about this, lainyn, because for me your translation could mean "an Internet domain publicly available" (in French, un "domaine Internet public"), while in the original phrase, it seems to be a stock phrase "domaine public" (public domain ?).
    I'd translate it "Is there public domain [notion] on the Internet"?
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    OlivierG said:
    I'd translate it "Is there public domain [notion] on the Internet"?
    That would be the following one in English:

    "Y a-t-il une notion de domaine public sur l'Internet."

    But I suppose that wouldn't make sense in French, neither in English. ;)

    Since what do you mean by "notion" here? :confused:
     

    le chat noir

    Senior Member
    French
    Even without context, it seems to me the meaning of this sentence is "does a public domain really exist on the Internet?"
    A more explicit French sentence would be :
    "existe-t-il [réellement] un domaine public de l'Internet ?"
     

    OlivierG

    Senior Member
    France / Français
    Whodunit said:
    That would be the following one in English:
    "Y a-t-il une notion de domaine public sur l'Internet."
    But I suppose that wouldn't make sense in French, neither in English. ;)
    Since what do you mean by "notion" here? :confused:
    It does make sense in French, I think.
    I meant "Does the concept of 'public domain' exist on the Internet ?"
     

    Gaverz

    Senior Member
    England, English
    Salut

    I've got this text that says "a-t-il ajouté"

    what does it actually mean - i think that ajouté means added but im not sure what the "a-t-il" is all about. Can you help?!

    Thanks
     

    Gil

    Senior Member
    Français, Canada
    Gaverz said:
    Salut

    I've got this text that says "a-t-il ajouté"

    what does it actually mean - i think that ajouté means added but im not sure what the "a-t-il" is all about. Can you help?!

    Thanks
    It's the inversion of "il a ajouté"
    Examples:
    A-t-il ajouté du sucre dans son café?
    Il n'aimait pas son café, aussi a-t-il ajouté du sucre.
     
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