Yeah, right.

Status
Not open for further replies.

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
Rosemary, Hal's girlfriend, bumps into her old boyfriend and Peace Corps mate Ralph. Later she tells Hal that Ralph called her and wants her to join his group and go out to an island. Hal thinks the reason she's going to go is Ralph himself:
-- You bump into pretty boy Ralph on Friday, the sparks are flying, and now what, you're gonna go and save the world in Carabas?
-- This has nothing to do with me and Ralph.
-- Yeah, right. He's obviously crazy about you.
Shallow Hal, movie

Does that mean "it does have something to do with you and Ralph"? Thanks.
 
  • Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    Yes. It means roughly "I don't believe you". It reminds me of a joke where an English professor explains that in English a double negative makes a positive, but that two positives never make a négative. To which a Glaswegian in the back row responds "Aye, right".
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Thank you.
    One question:

    1)
    -- This has nothing to do with me and Ralph.
    -- Right.

    2)
    -- This has nothing to do with me and Ralph.
    -- Yeah, it does.

    3)
    -- This has nothing to do with me and Ralph.
    -- [edit] No, it doesn't.

    This "has nothing" is tricky to me. Could you please tell what the three above would mean if they were said in the OP context.
     
    Last edited:

    dermott

    Senior Member
    B.E. via Australian English
    Rosemary's "This has nothing to do with me and Ralph" = Her saying Ralph is not the reason she is going. His "Yeah, right" = him saying I don't believe you. It sounds like he's agreeing with her but it is sarcasm. It's a very common retort in this context.

    Of your 3 alternatives:

    1. Could mean "Okay, I believe you". But could also mean "I don't believe you" if said sarcastically. It would all be in the actor's delivery of the line. It means the latter.

    2. Is simply contradicting her, saying Ralph is the reason she's going.

    3. See (1). "Yeah, (of course) it doesn't". EDIT. You've subsequently edited the line. Ignore this comment 3.

    This is where reading screen dialogue is tricky. Meaning can depend on the way an actor delivers a line of dialogue.
     
    Last edited:

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    "There's no relation between Hal's inviting me and our past relationship.", "Our former relationship has nothing to do with Ralph's invitation." Your 3) isn't possible. If Hal wanted to express disbelief, as he does in "Yeah, right.", he'd say something like "Yeah, sure it doesn't." By the way, for your 2), I'd say, "(Oh,) yes it does."
     
    Last edited:

    Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    1 would appear to be an acceptance of the denial. The meaning would depend on non-verbal cues.
    2 is a straightforward rebuttal
    3 doesn't seem very likely to me - I can't imagine anyone using it.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Thank you.
    One question:

    1)
    -- This has nothing to do with me and Ralph.
    -- Right.

    2)
    -- This has nothing to do with me and Ralph.
    -- Yeah, it does.

    3)
    -- This has nothing to do with me and Ralph.
    -- No, it doesn't.

    This "has nothing" is tricky to me. Could you please tell what the three above would mean if they were said in the OP context.
    In #1, 'right' would mean 'You're right. I agree with you'.

    #2, if it was 'Yes it does' it would mean 'I disagree with you - it does have something to to with you and Ralph'.

    We wouldn't say #3.


    Cross-posted.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Thank you everyone!

    Sorry, I edited the '3)' (which x-posted with heypresto's post), I meant "No, it doesn't". So, now it means "I agree with you", am I right?
     

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    It's the tone of voice which tells us if Hal is accepting or indicating disbelief in Rosemary's statement. And do we know if Hal is the jealous type or not? And has Rosemary "strayed" in the past?
     

    dermott

    Senior Member
    B.E. via Australian English
    And I now have to agree with ain't and Glas. I was still recovering from trying to edit my post to catch up with the other edit. The new 3 now also depends entirely on the delivery of the line. The perils of analysing text meant to be said rather than read.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Thank you, all!
    ---------------------
    I had to edit my post because I initially was going to write "No, it doesn't", and "Yeah, it doesn't" was just a typo, so I thought it would be ok to edit it and mark the edit in red.:oops:
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    That the edit was OK?:)
    By the way, I edited my post #3 before anyone answered it!:)
    That is what you intended to do, but posts #4 through 7 were posted before you submitted your edit.
    This thread is too confused, and I am closing it.

    It appears to me that the original question has been answered, but if I am mistaken, please update and clarify your question and post it again.

    Cagey, moderator.
     
    Status
    Not open for further replies.
    < Previous | Next >
    Top