Yes-sayer/Yea-sayer/Nay-sayer

Schrodinger's_Cat

Senior Member
American English
Yes-sayer = someone who always agrees with authority and does what he's told.
Yea-sayer = One who is confidently affirmative in attitude; one who uncritically agrees.

Nay-sayer is the antonym of yea-sayer

Does anyone know what the Italian equivalents are for Yes-sayer, Yea-sayer and Nay-sayer ?
 
  • pandinorombante

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    Yes-sayer = someone who always agrees with authority and does what he's told.
    Yea-sayer = One who is confidently affirmative in attitude; one who uncritically agrees.

    Nay-sayer is the antonym of yea-sayer

    Does anyone know what the Italian equivalents are for Yes-sayer, Yea-sayer and Nay-sayer ?
    We don't have a specific expression, we would say "una persona che dice sempre di sì/no".. it's quite idiomatic, although it sounds like a literal translation..

    Hope it helps! :)
     

    pask46

    Senior Member
    Italy-italian
    Huh!
    We use an English expression, too!
    "Yesmen" (which, by the way, I don't really know wether is correct or not...)
    As in many other situations, Italian has a longer translation, and we tend to use English words: shorter and largely used by Tv announcers, journalists and so on.

    The Italian version could be:
    "accondiscendenti" but it has a neutral meaning, while yes-sayer is more about a person who won't say no (for personal interest, convenience, for many reasons).

    Or a whole sentence: "persone che dicono sempre (di) sì"

    English is definitely more used...
     

    Lorena1970

    Banned
    Italy, Italiano
    We say "un signorsì" contract form of signore (a generic man) and sì.
    "E' un signorsì"= "He is a yes-sayer"
     

    pask46

    Senior Member
    Italy-italian
    We say "un signorsì" contract form of signore (a generic man) and sì.
    "E' un signorsì"= "He is a yes-sayer"
    Good!
    In effetti l'ho sentito diverse volte, ben trovato, brava.
    Ah, c'è anche "signornò"...
    E c'è pure il "bastian contrario"... uno che, per partito preso, dice sempre no, o comunque il contrario.

    "Quello è un bastian contrario", ovvero uno che ha sempre da ridire, da obiettare.

    NB Signorsì comes from military world and is English "Yessir!"
     
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    pask46

    Senior Member
    Italy-italian
    We're not so politically correct!
    But keep in mind that signore e signora differ for a vowel only... we go with "signor" and gender problems are wiped off!;)
     

    pask46

    Senior Member
    Italy-italian
    The word "policeperson" exists, but not many used it.

    see http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/policeperson?r=14
    I guessed so...
    In Italian words as "dottore", "professore", "ministro" has been changed in their feminine version
    professoressa=professora
    dottoressa=dottora
    ministressa (that was not used at all)=ministra

    The latter became of common use since we did not have female ministers in the past, so the word has easily been adopted in everyday language, now that many women are in charge as ministers.

    But professoressa and dottoressa resist (and we don't feel we need to change them, too).
    To me, politically correct is a waste of time. And a clumsy contribution to gender equality...
     
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