Yes, she's.

Thomas1

Senior Member
polszczyzna warszawska
My question is: can I use such shortcuts in short affirmative answers.

For instance:

-Is your wife a police officer?
-Yes, she's.

To me it sounds somewhat weird, but it may stem up from the fact that I was taught the correct version, i.e. yes, she is., etc.


Tom

PS: I have used the search function but I coulnd't find that in the forum so sorry if this has already been discussed.
 
  • Joelline

    Senior Member
    American English
    Hi Thomas,

    In AE, "she's" would sound like the beginning of a sentence you failed to complete (i.e., "Yes, she's working in the 5th precinct."). In fact, the "is" of "Yes, she is" is usually slightly stressed in a sentence such as you show in your example.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Hi Thomas,

    In AE, "she's" would sound like the beginning of a sentence you failed to complete (i.e., "Yes, she's working in the 5th precinct."). In fact, the "is" of "Yes, she is" is usually slightly stressed in a sentence such as you show in your example.
    Hello Joelline,

    Exactly, I'd also expect something that follows it, and here it looks like someone hasn't finished the sentence.

    Anyway, it is indeed a short answer and nothing follows it. Do you hear anything like that from natives now and then? And if you heard it (from natives, of course) what would you think of them?


    Tom
     

    french4beth

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Exactly, I'd also expect something that follows it, and here it looks like someone hasn't finished the sentence. I agree.

    Anyway, it is indeed a short answer and nothing follows it. Do you hear anything like that from natives now and then? no And if you heard it (from natives, of course) what would you think of them? I wouldn't understand what they were saying.
     

    Joelline

    Senior Member
    American English
    Thomas,

    The only time I've ever heard something like "Yes, she's..." from a native is when someone gets distracted or interrupted and never finishes the thought. In that case, I've got the feeling the conversation would go something like this:

    Me: Is your wife a police officer?
    Bob: Yes, she's...
    Me: She's what?
    Bob: Huh?
    Me: You said, "Yes, she's...", so I'm asking WHAT she is! OK, Let's just start again! Is your wife a police officer?!!
     

    . 1

    Banned
    Australian Australia
    It sounds too weird to say, "Yes, she's."

    You could most certainly use, "Yes, she's in the Oval Office" but this requires more words to follow she's which I just can not follow with a period.

    .,,
     

    mgarizona

    Senior Member
    US - American English
    Another problem with using a self-standing she's is that it is pronounced exactly the same as sheez, a euphemistically mild oath conconcted to avoid saying 'Jesus!'

    So "yes, she's" would sound like you were saying "yes, sheez!" and one would wonder why you were so annoyed about being asked such a simple question.
     
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