Yiddish: אוּן עֶס דִיךְ גוּט אָן

Brautryðjandinn í Úlfsham

Senior Member
English - USA
Hello!
Could somebody please tell me what the words "es dich git un" mean in the following sentence:

הֶער זִיךְ צוּ פֵייטֶעלֶע מַיינֶער, דוּ הָאסְט בִּיכְלַל נִישְׁט קֵיין פֶּעקְל, אוּן אַבְרֶעימְל הָאט אַזַא גְרוֹיסֶע אָנְגֶעפִילְטֶע זַאק מִיט נַאשׁ, זֵיי נִישְׁט קֵיין נַאר, בַּאלְד ווֶען קֵיינֶער זֶעט נִישְׁט כַאפּ עֶס אַרוֹיס, אוּן עֶס דִיךְ גוּט אָן

Her zich tzi, Faitele maaner, di host bichlal nisht kain peckl, in Avreiml hot aza groise ungefilte zak mit nash, zai nisht kain nar, bald ven kainer zeit nisht chap es arous, in es dich git un.

Does it perhaps mean "and eat up (well)"? That would make sense in context. Here's then my full translation:
Listen, my dear little Faitel, you don't have a packet at all, and Avreiml has such a big stuffed sack of snacks, don't be a fool, soon when nobody sees swipe it, and eat up well.

Thank you very much!
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • duvija

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Uruguay
    Except that this dative is an accusative, isn't it?

    I don't stick my nose on the issue of what's an ethic dative. I'm a phonologist and know better than discussing Latin based syntax applied to other languages... (syntacticians never get this right anyway).
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    I don't stick my nose on the issue of what's an ethic dative. I'm a phonologist and know better than discussing Latin based syntax applied to other languages... (syntacticians never get this right anyway).
    I'm not quite sure what you are talking about. The dative/accusative distinction is native in Yiddish and not an interpretative application of Latin syntax. דיך is accusative and דיר is dative.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top