Yiddish: אלץ ווינש צים נייעם

  • cfu507

    Senior Member
    Hebrew
    It is Yiddish. The words I recognized are:
    ווינש means don't cry
    פון מיר means from me
     

    scriptum

    Senior Member
    Israel / Hebrew, Russian
    My Yiddish is very bad; anyway, to the best of my understanding, this is a new year wishes letter.
     

    David

    Banned
    Like many of us I can understand much less written Yiddish than I can spoken, and even less when in script rather than printed...but something about

    "All [good] wishes (I think ווינש is "wishes") in the New Year. I send this picture of me with my "kinderlech" to my never-forgotten dear sister and her grieving? children" ..From me...dear love... I bless... .

    there is more obscured by the photographer's stamp and the English "Papa's sister (?) and children."

    I can't read the signature, or perhaps it is a Polish or Ukrainian place name: Maleh Bratletz, something like that. I will keep working on it. A little Germanized--un (and) is spelled und as in German... Pls post whole text if you get it.
     

    cfu507

    Senior Member
    Hebrew
    Here is the full translation with some help from my neighbor.

    The letter was sent from a woman to her sister:

    We are blessing (you) in this New Year. I'm sending a picture of me and my kids and (sending) my love. We don't forget our beloved sister and her kids. Missing you from the deep of my heart. Your sister ... (her name)



    אלץ=all (of us) - altz
    ווינש = blessing - vaynetz
    צים נייעם יאר = to the new year - tzim (tsu) nayyor
    שיק = sending - shikn
    איך = me/I - ich
    דאס = this - dos
    בילד = picture - bild
    פין מיר = from me - fin mir
    מיט = with - mit
    מיינע = mine - mine
    קינדערליך = kids - kinderlich
    פאר מיין ליבע = for my love - far mayn libe
    נישט = no/not - nisht

    פערגעסינע = forget - fargesn
    שוועסטר = sister - shvester
    אונד = and - un
    אירע = yours - ayre
    גיטרייע = devoted - gitraye
    קינדער = kids - kinder

    פון מיר = from me - fun mir
    טיף = deep - tif
    בענקענדע = miss you - benkendeke
     

    Spectre scolaire

    Senior Member
    Maltese and Russian
    Wow! Thanks a lot, cfu507! :) This was very useful! I take a strong interest in Yiddish, but I have limited knowledge of deciphering handwriting.

    Is there any indication of date on this card – or is it possible to say just about when it may have been written?

    Is it possible to distinguish different handwritings in various Yiddish communities (as you can distinguish quite a number of “national handwritings” in Europe)?

    PS: There is something wrong with the last word...
    :) :)
     

    David

    Banned
    Thanks to cfu507's knowledge, not mine, I can send you a line for line transcription in Hebrew and Latin alphabets and a line-for-line tentative translation.

    אלץ ווינש צים נייעם
    יאר[!] שיק איך דאס בילד
    פין מיר מיט מיינע קינדערליך
    פאר מיין ליבע
    נישט[-]פערגעסינע שוועסטער
    אונד אירע גיטרייע
    קינדער
    פון מיר [מיט?/דיין?] טיף
    בענקענדע שוועסטר
    מאלע בראטעקס​


    Alts vinch [vaynets?] tsum nayem
    yor[,] Shik ich dos bild
    fon mir mit mayne kinderlech
    far mayn libe
    nisht[-]fargesene shvester
    und ire getreye
    kinder.
    Fun mir [mit?/dayn?] tif
    benkende shvester,
    Male Brateks

    Combinging cfu's real knowledge with my laborious transcribing, the translation might be

    All wishes for New
    Year's[.] I send ("send I") this picture
    of me and my children ("kinderlech")
    for my dear
    not[-]forgotten sister
    and her devoted
    children.
    From me[, your?] deep(ly)
    (benkende="missing-you"[?] sister
    (From me, your sister who profoundly misses you[?])...
    Male Bratleks...

    The second word is not spelled vaynetz. cfu says it is pron. that way, so perhaps a Hebrew word pron vaynetz in Yiddish, a common phenomenon, but those word are usu. spelled in Hebrew, and this doesn't like to me like a Hebrew spelling: perhaps the writer mixed up spelling and pronunciation, which can vary a lot with the Hebrew words used in Yiddish. I thought the second word was vinsh, "wish/es" from German Wunsch, but I am no expert.

    I also don't see the word that is just "covered " by the 13 of the rubber-stamped address as "mit"...it looks more to me like dayn? dayne? ("your"). That would make the object of the adj. benkendeke the word cfu did not repeat in the little glossary, shvester, in the phrase "dayne benkendeke shvester."

    The last word, which looks to me like a family surname, may well also be "wrong" as you say, but those look to me like the letters in the original...I am no expert! The last letter could be a circle (s, samekh) or an e (ayin), written the the two upstrokes crossing at the top. The original might be clearer than the online copy.

    Perhaps somebody can resolve these questions or cfu who obviously knows lots more than I could enlighten me in my obscurity.
     

    PocketWatch

    Member
    USA English
    Thank you very much! I have been curious for a while about this translation (and some other Yiddish notes that I have lying around on the back of photos). I will post another thread shortly. It is a sentence or two long but am curious as to what it says.
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    Here is the full translation with some help from my neighbor.

    The letter was sent from a woman to her sister:

    We are blessing (you) in this New Year. I'm sending a picture of me and my kids and (sending) my love. We don't forget our beloved sister and her kids. Missing you from the deep of my heart. Your sister ... (her name)



    אלץ=all (of us) - altz OK
    ווינש = blessing - vaynetz NOK vinsh (wishes)
    צים נייעם יאר = to the new year - tzim (tsu) nayyor OK well almost: tzim nayem yaar
    שיק = sending - shikn OK again almost: shik (I send), no n. With n it would be the infinitive
    איך = me/I - ich OK
    דאס = this - dos OK
    בילד = picture - bild OK
    פין מיר = from me - fin mir OK
    מיט = with - mit OK
    מיינע = mine - mine OK to be consistent with the above the transctiption should be mayne
    קינדערליך = kids - kinderlich OK
    פאר מיין ליבע = for my love - far mayn libe OK
    נישט = no/not - nisht OK

    פערגעסינע = forget - fargesn NOK fergesene (forgotten, past participle with feminie inflection)
    שוועסטר = sister - shvester OK
    אונד = and - un OK again almost: und
    אירע = yours - ayre OK
    גיטרייע = devoted - gitraye OK
    קינדער = kids - kinder OK

    פון מיר = from me - fun mir OK
    טיף = deep - tif OK
    בענקענדע = miss you - benkendeke ??? not sure
     

    Slinkessa

    New Member
    English - United States
    בענק = benk = long for, yearn for, miss (1st and 3rd person present tense)
    בענקענדע = benkende = longing for, yearning for, missing
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top