Yiddish: אפרו אין די בעדער

Brautryðjandinn í Úlfsham

Senior Member
English - USA
Hello!
I was reading a children's book in Yiddish named "דער אינגער מתמיד"/"Der yinger masmid" and I didn't quite understand the following sentence:
דער קדושת יום טוב זי’’ע האט זיך דאן געפונען אין די שטאט קרעניץ, וואו ער איז געפארן אויף אפרו אין די בעדער אויף עטליכע וואכן, און ער האט אהין מיטגענומען מיט זיך אויך זיין הייליג קינד, דעם קליינעם יואלישל

Der Kdishas Yom Tov Zchisoy Yugein Uleini hot zich dan gefinen in di shtot Krenitz, vi er iz geforn ouf opri in di beder ouf etliche vochn, in er hot ahin mitgenimen mit zich ouch zaan heilig kind, dem kleinem Yoelishl.

Does "אפרו אין די בעדער" / "opri in di beder" mean "rest in the bathhouses"? I understand everything but this part.

Thank you very much!

 
  • rubidou

    Member
    German
    Does "אפרו אין די בעדער" / "opri in di beder" mean "rest in the bathhouses"? I understand everything but this part.​


    You're probably right ... at least I can't think of anything else that might fit. It has to make sense in the whole context, of course.

    By the way, do you happen to know if both pronunciations would be correct (oproo / opree)? Up to now I have only ever heard "oproo".

    I'm afraid I'm not much help to you ... sorry!

    - rubidou
     

    Brautryðjandinn í Úlfsham

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    [/LEFT]

    You're probably right ... at least I can't think of anything else that might fit. It has to make sense in the whole context, of course.

    By the way, do you happen to know if both pronunciations would be correct (oproo / opree)? Up to now I have only ever heard "oproo".

    I'm afraid I'm not much help to you ... sorry!

    - rubidou
    Thanks for your response!
    I have only heard the version "opree/opri" and not "opru/opruu". I think both are right but it just depends on the dialect. I've heard the sentence
    "מיר וועלן זיך אלע אפרוען אביסל"
    pronounced like this:
    "mir veln zich ale opree(i)en abisl"
    However for the word "ruhigkeit"/"רוהיגקייט", I've only heard "ruuhigkeit" and not "riihigkeit". I think that might be because it would be strange to say two "i" sounds in a row. Sometimes the letters komets alef ("א") and vof ("ו") are pronounced "u", but vof is usually pronounced "i" and sometimes komets alef and vof are pronounced "o".
     

    rubidou

    Member
    German
    Thanks for your answer!
    As a matter of fact, that website (online dict) you named was where I found those two versions, too. I didn't mean to say I question the source ... I just think opree sounds strange to me. As a native German speaker, -ruh sounds more familiar and correct, in a way, even though I know there are different ways of pronouncing it. Quite interesting, though :)
     
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