Yiddish: Meesa Meschina

airelibre

Senior Member
English - London
Hi there. In the recently released film The Limehouse Golem there is a part where the actress is tricked into saying what she believes to be "enjoy the show" to a Victorian London audience consisting mainly of Jews. It apparently means "die quickly" (or "die soon", can't quite remember). I'd like to know what she supposedly said, as all I can remember is something like מיסע משינע, which doesn't sound much like anything in German or Hebrew to me, which are my only real references for understanding Yiddish. Perhaps the first part is related to מוות in Hebrew though.
 
  • L'irlandais

    Senior Member
    Ireland: English-speaking ♂
    Elizabeth to say “Meesa Meschina” to the audience, which means “sudden death” in Hebrew.
    Source

    Film based on "Dan Leno and the Lime- house Golem (1994)" a Novel by Peter Ackroyd
    See in the context of the novel itself

    Bryce Courtenay’s The Potato Factory(1995) reuses the expression, suggesting it is Yiddish. See Page 285 of that book here
    Not sure which of the two authors has done their research incorrectly. Only Bryce's publication date hints his version lacks Mr. Ackroyd's originality.

    Perhaps worth mentioning the book was also published as "The Trial of Elizabeth Cree"(2012) an eBook
     
    Last edited:

    amikama

    a mi modo
    עברית
    It's simply Hebrew מיתה משונה in heavy Yiddish accent :) מיתה משונה (literally "strange death") means unnatural death.
     

    airelibre

    Senior Member
    English - London
    Elizabeth to say “Meesa Meschina” to the audience, which means “sudden death” in Hebrew.
    Source

    Film based on "Dan Leno and the Lime- house Golem (1994)" a Novel by Peter Ackroyd
    See in the context of the novel itself

    Bryce Courtenay’s The Potato Factory(1995) reuses the expression, suggesting it is Yiddish. See Page 285 of that book here
    Not sure which of the two authors has done their research incorrectly. Only Bryce's publication date hints his version lacks Mr. Ackroyd's originality.

    Perhaps worth mentioning the book was also published as "The Trial of Elizabeth Cree"(2012) an eBook
    Thanks, unfortunately the first two links lead me to pages I can't view, exceeded limit or something...

    It's simply Hebrew מיתה משונה in heavy Yiddish accent :) מיתה משונה (literally "strange death") means unnatural death.
    Thanks, makes sense now!
     
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