Yiddish: Meine Yidishe Mit beerger fun der Shtot New York

lapittenger

New Member
English
Hi all, I am working on a stage play about Mayor LaGuardia, and there is a short Yiddish passage in the text that I think was written phonetically, only to be pronounced. We think the rough translation is as follows: "My Yiddish friends from the state of New York, your support for Fiorello LaGuardia will do you good." However, we'd like a more accurate translation so we can put it in the program.

Meine Yidishe Mit beerger fun der Shtot New York, Ich vill helfen deenaytn fun der Yiddisher bafelkerun eier shtim far Fiorello La Gvardia vet helfn bafreedikn deedozeeke naytn mit frayd un libshaft.

Please contact me if you have any thoughts. Thanks!
 
  • Frank78

    Senior Member
    German
    It's not phonetically written but Yiddish as it looks like. :)

    I did a one-on-one translation (since it's closely related to German) but I have to admit it does not make much sense. :D
    I don't know if any Yiddish speakers are here. They could probably be more helpful.

    "My fellow Yiddish citizen of the city of New York, I want to help (on) the 9th
    of/from the Yiddish population, your voice/vote for FLG (will?) help to satisfy (to make it a sucess?) this 9th with joy and love."

    "vet" is actually "bet" but I think "will" is meant.

    Could the 9th refer to any kind of celebration on that day or was it an election day? Can you give some background information. I'm not sure if FLG asks for help or offers help.

    I hope I could, at least, help a bit.
     

    CapnPrep

    Senior Member
    AmE
    "9th" doesn't make much sense, does it? I think dee naytn means "the needs". I want to help the needs of the Jewish population, your vote will help satisfy these needs with etc. etc.
     

    duvija

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Uruguay
    Funny!
    'vet' is 'are going to' (a kind of future you use when you're sure it'll happen)
    bafreedikn (I believe it's 'liberate', or 'make happy')
    'deenaytn' is a mistery. It may be the 'needs' , or the date (9th of some month), or the neighborhood. I'll try to look it up better.
     

    fdb

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    Yes, “naytn” is clearly “Nöte”.

    “My Jewish co-citizens of the City of New York! I want to help the needs of the Jewish population. Your vote for FLG will help (me) to satisfy these needs gladly and graciously.”
     
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    duvija

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Uruguay

    Now it makes sense. And transcribed using the YIVO transliteration, which is now the standard in the US (not in Spanish, though):

    Mayne Yiddishe mitberger fun der Shtot New York, ikh vil helfn
    di naytn fun der Yiddisher bafelkerung. Ayer shtim far Fiorello La Gvardia vet helfn bafridikn di dozike naytn mit freyd un libshaft.

    (the last words should be: with happiness and love). I can't find 'gladly'...
     

    CapnPrep

    Senior Member
    AmE
    Mayne Yiddishe mitberger fun der Shtot New York, ikh vil helfn di neytn fun der Yiddisher bafelkerung. Ayer shtim far Fiorello La Gvardia vet helfn bafridikn di dozike neytn mit freyd un libshaft.
    It's apparently the word נויטן noytn with Northeastern Yiddish pronunciation (so with the same vowel as פֿרייד freyd).
     

    duvija

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Uruguay
    It's apparently the word נויטן noytn with Northeastern Yiddish pronunciation (so with the same vowel as פֿרייד freyd).
    You're totally right. My problem is that my parents spoke Polish/Ukranian Yiddish, but in Uruguay, all of my friends' parents spoke very different varieties - they came from all over Europe, of course. Somehow they managed to create a 'standard', different from the one called 'standard', needless to say. Then, in school, I was taught that 'proper standard' (the one nobody ever spoke... Like [punkt capoyer], that was either 'pinkt kapoyer, or punkt capeyer'), and now my vowels got totally mixed up. I discovered I never realized my friends' parent spoke other dialects. As a child, you simply listen to what you need...
     

    lapittenger

    New Member
    English
    You guys are fantastic. Seriously, thank you. I do hope you enjoyed the process of narrowing this speech down, as it was very helpful to us!
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    bafreedikn (I believe it's 'liberate', or 'make happy')
    "Satisfy". The root is German "Frieden" (peace). You probable don't recognize the root because in Yiddish the Herbrew "Shalom" replaced the German word.
     
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    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    Do you mean 'peace'?
    Yes of course, sorry for the typo.
    In which case it could be 'liberate'?
    I couldn't see how this connection should be possible. The morphological analysis be-fried-ig-en (in German; I am not sure about the Yiddish spelling, so I stick to German). -en is the infinitive ending, -ig is a suffix for adjective derivations, cognate and equivalent to English -y (like in louse-lousy, hand-handy, fruit-fruity, &c). The prefix be- when used to construct a (always transitive) verb from an adjective usually means to make/render XXX, like in English to belittle = to make little. Hence befriedigen could, semantically less accurately but displaying the logic of the construct better, be translated to appease. I.e. if you satisfy needs - Nöte befriedigen. you "appease" them, you put them to rest. That is the logic of the word.

    One more thing: you would actually normally translate needs as Bedürfnisse and not as Nöte because Nöte has a more specific meaning than its English cognate needs: It specifically means emergency needs, sorrows or worries and not needs in general. I don't know in how far Yiddish נויטע (noyte) more closely follows the German or the English meaning.
     

    duvija

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Uruguay
    Yes of course, sorry for the typo.
    I couldn't see how this connection should be possible. The morphological analysis be-fried-ig-en (in German; I am not sure about the Yiddish spelling, so I stick to German). -en is the infinitive ending, -ig is a suffix for adjective derivations, cognate and equivalent to English -y (like in louse-lousy, hand-handy, fruit-fruity, &c). The prefix be- when used to construct a (always transitive) verb from an adjective usually means to make/render XXX, like in English to belittle = to make little. Hence befriedigen could, semantically less accurately but displaying the logic of the construct better, be translated to appease. I.e. if you satisfy needs - Nöte befriedigen. you "appease" them, you put them to rest. That is the logic of the word.

    One more thing: you would actually normally translate needs as Bedürfnisse and not as Nöte because Nöte has a more specific meaning than its English cognate needs: It specifically means emergency needs, sorrows or worries and not needs in general. I don't know in how far Yiddish נויטע (noyte) more closely follows the German or the English meaning.

    Bafrayen, in Yiddish, is to free some(one), to liberate some(one).
    (from an old song)
    Alzo mutik in di reyen, reyen (or 'rayen')
    in di reyen tsu bafrayen, bafrayen
    tsu bafrayen, tsu banayen, banayen
    undzer alte velt.
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    Bafrayen, in Yiddish, is to free some(one), to liberate some(one).
    The root of this verb, German spelling befreien, morphological analysis be-frei-en, is the adjective frei pronounced [fʁaɪ] < Old High German frī, cognate and semantic equivalent of English free. There is no connection to befriedigen and its root Frieden pronounced [friːd(ə)n] < Old High German fridu, cognate to English frith. The two roots look superficially similar because they eventually trace back to the same PIE root (*pri- = to love) but apart from this common origin in a very distant past, the two roots are completely unrelated in usage and meaning.
     

    duvija

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Uruguay
    "Satisfy". The root is German "Frieden" (peace). You probable don't recognize the root because in Yiddish the Herbrew "Shalom" replaced the German word.
    Sorry, in Yiddish 'peace' is 'fridn' and 'sholem', both. The one I'm referring to is 'fridn', of course.
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    Sorry, in Yiddish 'peace' is 'fridn' and 'sholem', both. The one I'm referring to is 'fridn', of course.
    If you are familiar with both "fridn" and "fray" then I am surprised that you associate the two words.
    At some point, I got lost. I still believe we are talking about a cognate of 'freedom'.
    Than explain me what "fridn" and the derived "befridign" (remember, the sentence is for an AE speaker, therefore the outlandish transcription "bafreedikn") has to do with "fray".
     
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