Yiddish: Oishe geveine lech

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Inquisitive_Inquisitor

Member
Bulgarian
Hello there!
I am reading a book with some phrases in Yiddish (I hope I'm not too wrong) which are transcribed in English. The first one is "Oishe geveine lech". Could anyone help me guess what it might mean?
The book is Jan Eliasberg's Hanna's War.
 
  • Mr.Dent

    Senior Member
    English - all over the USA
    If you can provide more context for the phrase it would help. What was the situation? What does the entire paragraph say?
    I'm taking a guess here -- Moishe (a man's name) was lekh (This would probably be the usual transliteration). "Lekh" by itself does not mean anything as far as I know, but it does form an integral part of many different words. You can look it up here to get an idea: Yiddish dictionary lookup
     

    L'irlandais

    Senior Member
    Ireland: English-speaking ♂
    I have it on good authority.
    ...

    Oishe Geveine Lech is a more formal version of the Yiddish slang phrase “Oy Gevalt…” which, roughly translated, means “Oh, for crying out loud…”

    In context: Epstein is verbally "rolling his eyes" and using a Yiddish expression that comments on the over the top, borderline ludicrous security measures being taken by the military in ordering everyone at Los Alamos to refer to the bomb only by the absurd word “gadget.”
    ...
    @Inquisitive_Inquisitor
     
    Last edited:

    Demiurg

    Senior Member
    German
    Jan Eliasberg said:
    Oishe Geveine Lech is a more formal version of the Yiddish slang phrase “Oy Gevalt…” which, roughly translated, means “Oh, for crying out loud…”
    Does Jan Eliasberg speak Yiddish? To me "oishe geveine lech" looks like a spelling variant of "oysergeveynlekh" (German: außergewöhnlich) - extraordinary.
     
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