yo tambien diera lo no tengo

sowhat59

New Member
Korean - South Korea
I'm almost a beginner in speaking/listening but read/write a little bit better.
A new friend of mine sent me an email and wrote

diera lo no tengo porque se repitan esos días aquí

If I were to translate this literally, it would be

I give you what I don't have because those days repeat here.

But I don't think that's what this means because it's not coherent with previous sentence at all.
My guess is that some words there are idioms. am I correct?
Please help me translate this! thank you
 
  • Mariadelmar0320

    Member
    Spanish - Colombia
    I would give anything to make those days happen again seems fine to me but would help if some native give their opinion.
     

    inib

    Senior Member
    British English
    I agree with Mariadelmar's translation if the original is (or should be) Diera/Daría lo que no tengo...
    Just to confirm, maybe you could tell us something about that previous sentence.
     

    sowhat59

    New Member
    Korean - South Korea
    The whole sentence (paragraph) is

    Sinceramente un beso,te deseo lo mejor te extraño yo tambien diera lo no tengo porque se repitan esos dias aquì

    In emails, he usually doesn't put any punctuation marks. So it's possible that some words are also misspelled.
     
    Last edited:

    Rafa_1961

    Member
    Spanish
    "Sinceramente, un beso. Te deseo lo mejor. Te extraño, y yo también daría lo que no tengo porque se repitieran esos días que pasamos aquí".
     

    Aviador

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Chile
    I agree with Rafa, although, in my variety of the Spanish language, I would say:
    Sinceramente, un beso. Te deseo lo mejor. Te echo de menos, y yo también daría lo que no tengo porque se repitieran esos días que pasamos aquí.

    ... In emails, he usually doesn't put any punctuation marks...
    Well, I put punctuation marks wherever the text calls for. Be it e-mails, WhatsApp, essays, reports, whatever...and use correct spelling too.
     

    sowhat59

    New Member
    Korean - South Korea
    I agree with Rafa, although, in my variety of the Spanish language, I would say:
    Sinceramente, un beso. Te deseo lo mejor. Te echo de menos, y yo también daría lo que no tengo porque se repitieran esos días que pasamos aquí.


    Well, I put punctuation marks wherever the text calls for. Be it e-mails, WhatsApp, essays, reports, whatever...and use correct spelling too.
    So granted that what he wrote doesn't have any punctuation marks, and misspells, how is the sentence in my original post translated to?

    Thanks!
     

    Rafa_1961

    Member
    Spanish
    I agree with Rafa, although, in my variety of the Spanish language, I would say:
    Sinceramente, un beso. Te deseo lo mejor. Te echo de menos, y yo también daría lo que no tengo porque se repitieran esos días que pasamos aquí.


    Well, I put punctuation marks wherever the text calls for. Be it e-mails, WhatsApp, essays, reports, whatever...and use correct spelling too.
    En España también es mucho más frecuente utilizar "te echo de menos" que "te extraño".
     

    inib

    Senior Member
    British English
    Everybody seems to agree that the word "que" is missing and, as I said before, Mariadelmar gave you a good (non-literal) translation. If you really want it word for word, it would be something like: I would give what I haven't (even) got in order that those days here should be repeated.:eek:
    I'll leave it up to the better-qualified to comment on diera instead of daría. It is quite common to use the imperfect subjunctive instead of the conditional with certain verbs such as deber, haber, querer. I haven't come across it before with dar and have no idea whether it is due to a regional factor, a cultural one or just a slip of the finger on the keyboard.
     

    Rafa_1961

    Member
    Spanish
    Everybody seems to agree that the word "que" is missing and, as I said before, Mariadelmar gave you a good (non-literal) translation. If you really want it word for word, it would be something like: I would give what I haven't (even) got in order that those days here should be repeated.
    I'll leave it up to the better-qualified to comment on diera instead of daría. It is quite common to use the imperfect subjunctive instead of the conditional with certain verbs such as deber, haber, querer. I haven't come across it before with dar and have no idea whether it is due to a regional factor, a cultural one or just a slip of the finger on the keyboard.
    "Diera lo que no tengo" suena mucho más culto, poético, literario y tal vez incluso un poco anticuado. Nadie en una conversación normal diría "diera lo que no tengo". Todo el mundo diría "daría lo que no tengo".
     

    inib

    Senior Member
    British English
    "Diera lo que no tengo" suena mucho más culto, poético, literario y tal vez incluso un poco anticuado. Nadie en una conversación normal diría "diera lo que no tengo". Todo el mundo diría "daría lo que no tengo".
    I suspect that some might object to it on grammar terms too.
     

    sowhat59

    New Member
    Korean - South Korea
    Wow. Thank you so much all!
    No wonder I couldn't translate the sentence. Even native speakers share a slightly different opinions on this!

    Well, the sender of this email is a native spanish speaker. As inib pointed out, his way of saying it was probably a regional, cultural difference or just a more literal expression as Rafa mentioned.

    I'm only getting the hang of conjugations for each difference tenses now. Spanish is so hard! :eek: but such a beautiful language worth studying everyday.
     
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