(Yo) tengo una pluma.

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  • gvergara

    Senior Member
    Español
    Well, the easiest thing to say is that Spanish is a pro-drop language, meaning that since verbs are inflected for each grammatical person, it is not necessary (it is even redundant) to use a pronoun as the verbal form indicates who or what the subject is. That's why you usually drop the pronoun unless you want to emphasize who the subject is.
     

    aldonzalorenzo

    Senior Member
    Castellano
    As gvergara says, the usual way is not to use the pronoun. You use it when you want to emphasize it.
    In your case, people would say "tengo una pluma". But if someone is saying "Tengo un lápiz", to contrast it you may say "Yo tengo una pluma".
     
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    Cerros de Úbeda

    Senior Member
    UK
    Spanish - Spain (Galicia)
    is there a difference between "Yo tengo una pluma." and "Tengo una pluma."?
    Yes, the one with the subject is more emphatic - intended to stress what is MY particular case, or WHO has a pen:

    'Dick tiene lápiz. YO, boli.'

    A- ¿Quién tiene bolígrafo?
    B- ¡Yo (tengo boli)!


    So, the "yo" emphasizes the fact that I have a pen, as opposed to Dick, who has a pencil. Right?
    Yes, that's correct.

    Although, to be exact, the 'yo' emphasizes the subject, rather than the action. It stresses 'WHO' has the pen. That is, who is the subject.


    'Dick has a pencil, while I have a pen.'
    - Dick tiene un lápiz, y yo tengo un bolígrafo.


    (*) Bolígrafo / Pluma:
    Note that we usually say 'bolígrafo'. Or 'boli', in its shortened, colloquial form. The term that kids use at school.


    "Yo tengo una pluma" meant "As for me, I have a pen."
    "As for me" is quite an emphatic phrase.

    We usually translate it as a different expression to the subject. It would be; "En mi caso,...".
     
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    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    (*) Bolígrafo / Pluma:
    Note that we usually say 'bolígrafo'. Or 'boli', in its shortened, colloquial form. The term that kids use at school.
    I believe that "we" here means "we Spaniards." In Mexico, pluma is the most common word for pen, unless there is a need to specify that it is a ballpoint pen.
     

    Cerros de Úbeda

    Senior Member
    UK
    Spanish - Spain (Galicia)
    Well, I was talking in general, referring to Spanish-speaking people broadly.

    I always refer to Spain's Spanish, if you want to specify its variety (as per my profile).

    I didn't have in mind the particular Mexican variety of Spanish... I wasn't aware of that particularity.

    In Spain, 'pluma' is also used, but either old-fashioned, or formal-ish (how liberal professionals like lawyers and so on would talk).
     

    Marsianitoh

    Senior Member
    Spanish-Spain
    In Spain a "pluma" is a "fountain pen" and a " bolígrafo" a "ballpoint pen".
     
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    Loby333

    New Member
    Spanish, Spain
    Well, it is more correct without the "Yo", because in Spanish is innecesary, and it is strange if you speak with it, it sounds unnatural
     
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