You´re always welcome here

Jonathan1975

Senior Member
English U.S.
¿Cómo se expresa la idea "you´re always welcome to come to the meeting" en español?

Digamos que soy miembro de un club de ajedrez y quiero que un amigo me acompañe...

No me suena "Eres bienvenido." ¿Cómo sería?

Gracias,

Jonathan
 
  • padredeocho

    Banned
    United States
    I was once at a quinceñera and I asked the 15 where her father was, so that I could interview him. Her reply, "Don't waste your time. He is so drunk right now he doesn't even know where he is." She said this in English. Most the Mexicans I work with out here in Utah a fairly bi-lingual, and nearly all the Mexican kids are.

    Example: Aunque todos estén borrachos, pues, todos están invitados.
     

    padredeocho

    Banned
    United States
    Nope, Utah. Love my job, and most my clients are Mexicans, and so that is the "Spanish" that I am most familiar with. You know, things like "platicar" instead of "hablar", "pachanga" instead of "fiesta", etc.
     

    padredeocho

    Banned
    United States
    Funny how we say "Mexican Spanish." In college I was taught that in Spain, you will never hear Spanish. Spanish just means from Spain, and many languages are therefore "Spanish." Isn't "Castallano" the real language that we have out west? In Argentina, that was all I ever heard.
     

    padredeocho

    Banned
    United States
    LOL. I remember when I first got to Argentina. All I kept hearing was Castallano, and I had never heard that word before. I said espanol and got an ear full.

    The Mexicans always say espanol.
     

    mrbilal87

    Senior Member
    English (NAmE)
    Funny how we say "Mexican Spanish." In college I was taught that in Spain, you will never hear Spanish. Spanish just means from Spain, and many languages are therefore "Spanish." Isn't "Castallano" the real language that we have out west? In Argentina, that was all I ever heard.
    If you mean you never hear the word español in Spain to refer to the language, then I'm sorry, but I strongly disagree. :eek: People say "español" all the time in Spain. In fact, I asked someone when do they use the term "castellano," and they said only when they're comparing "castellano" with other langauges from Spain.
     

    padredeocho

    Banned
    United States
    Did I say I was in Spain? Nope. I was told this in a college class. That those in Spain do not refer to Castallano as Spanish. So, If I were in Spain, and I asked them what language the speak, they would say, Castallano or Espanol?
     

    Mate

    Senior Member
    Castellano - Argentina
    As students we were taught to say castellano instead of español because besides castellano Spain has a handful of genuine languages: catalá, galego, euzcarra, etc. And among all these Spanish languages castellano, the original language from Castilla, happened to be the one that was carried to and spread into America.
     

    mrbilal87

    Senior Member
    English (NAmE)
    padredeocho said:
    Did I say I was in Spain? Nope. I was told this in a college class. That those in Spain do not refer to Castallano as Spanish. So, If I were in Spain, and I asked them what language the speak, they would say, Castallano or Espanol?
    Most likely they'd say "español." "Castellano" in Spain, as I'm told, is used when comparing Castilian Spanish with other dialects of Spanish spoken in Spain, as they're all forms of Spanish.


    padredeocho said:
    Does this offend the Gallegos, Basques, and others who also speak a Spanish language?
    That I can't speak for. I'd rather wait for someone from Spain to cover that topic.:eek:
     

    lforestier

    Senior Member
    Puerto Rico - Spanish/English
    The proper name for the language is Español, which is derived MOSTLY from the Castilian dialect spoken in parts of Spain, very similar to Leonese and other dialects in that region.
    http://www.unileon.es/temario.php?cod=0407160&elementoID=588

    Castellano was really just a dialect so it would be incorrect to call the language that in this century.
    It's still common in my country to say Cartilla Castellana when refering to a beginning grammar textbook. Likewise, I've heard people in the countryside say "Ese no habla en cristiano" when referring to non-Spanish speakers.
    The same reason people in Great Britain don't feel offended by that name even though they may speak Gaelic or Welsh within the English borders (not counting the people in Wales and Scotland)
    It's a serious debate on what constitute a dialect or language but if you check the United Nations charter, it has Spanish (Español) as one of the official languages. There's no mention of Castilian because the language covers all those dialects mentioned.
     

    Jonathan1975

    Senior Member
    English U.S.
    A ver, para confirmar con los hablantes nativos...

    ¿Todos están de acuerdo de que funcionan bien estas dos frases?

    "Siempre serás bien recibido..."
    "Siempre serás bienvenido..."

    Gracias,

    Jonathan
     
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