You’re welcome for the present; I’m so glad you like it

lilmisssunshine58

Senior Member
English, USA
Hi

Please could you tell me have I used the semi colon correctly or should it be a comma instead?

"You’re welcome for the present; I’m so glad you like it."

Thank you


(Please correct my English - Thanks!)
 
  • Hi

    Please could you tell me have I used the semi colon correctly or should it be a comma instead?

    "You’re welcome for the present; I’m so glad you like it."

    Thank you


    (Please correct my English - Thanks!)
    Hi lilmisssunshine,

    We don't usually say "you're welcome for the present."

    Just say, after you have been thanked, "You're welcome; I'm so glad you like it.

    You can use a semi-colon or a full stop. A comma would create too short a pause.

    LRV
     

    jann

    co-mod'
    English - USA
    You’re welcome for the present; I’m so glad you like it. :eek:
    English can be so ambiguous! While there is nothing wrong with this sentence per se, I completely misunderstood it until I read La reine victoria's post! I read, "you're welcome for the present (moment)," ie., "you're welcome for now," and I wondered, "Why wouldn't you also be welcome later?!" :D

    You`re welcome to have this present.:warning:
    But in American English, this means something a little different: "you may have this present (if you want it)." In other words, it is an offer, and not a response when the person thanks you!


    I think La reine's suggestion is clearest:
    Just say, after you have been thanked, "You're welcome; I'm so glad you like it. :thumbsup:
     
    English can be so ambiguous! While there is nothing wrong with this sentence per se, I completely misunderstood it until I read La reine victoria's post! I read, "you're welcome for the present (moment)," ie., "you're welcome for now," and I wondered, "Why wouldn't you also be welcome later?!" :D

    But in American English, this means something a little different: "you may have this present (if you want it)." In other words, it is an offer, and not a response when the person thanks you!


    I think La reine's suggestion is clearest:

    Yes!!! But I mean that under certain circumstances this structure would be possible, if you want to have both "welcome", and "present. You are quite right , English is very ambiguous.
     
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