You are not afraid even a little?

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yuva

Banned
Arabic
I want to ask the person in front of me whether he is not even afraid a little? I specifically want to use the word 'little' because other person is acting like he is not afraid at all, not even a little and he is saying only I'm afraid. So the sentence below is the one I can think of, to ask him whether he is not even afraid a little. Is that correct?

You are not afraid even a little?
 
  • yuva

    Banned
    Arabic
    I think the words are all good. I would just change the order:

    "Aren't you even a little afraid?" or "You aren't even a little afraid?"
    I wonder, this is how a native speaker will ask while speaking. This sentence looks like a sentence in written text book English. Do you speak the exact sentence if you ask that question to friend while speaking causally?
     

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    I wonder, this is how a native speaker will ask while speaking. This sentence looks like a sentence in written text book English. Do you speak the exact sentence if you ask that question to friend while speaking causally?
    You have a good ear: the sentence, while entirely correct, does sound slightly formal. In a casual context, I'd be more likely to say "You're not afraid at all? Not even a bit?"

    (And many, many English speakers would use "scared" rather than "afraid." But that, strictly speaking, would be incorrect!)
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    You have a good ear: the sentence, while entirely correct, does sound slightly formal. In a casual context, I'd be more likely to say "You're not afraid at all? Not even a bit?"
    I agree. I think I'd also make two questions out of it.
     

    yuva

    Banned
    Arabic
    You have a good ear: the sentence, while entirely correct, does sound slightly formal. In a casual context, I'd be more likely to say "You're not afraid at all? Not even a bit?"

    (And many, many English speakers would use "scared" rather than "afraid." But that, strictly speaking, would be incorrect!)

    Thanks a lot. This is what I wanted. This is the way of speaking in casual dialog.
     
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