You are such a pus-say

SarahJL

Member
Italian
Buondì,
sono alle prese con un battibecco scherzoso fra donne, Scottie e Mullins, che si stanno allenando.
Scottie sta eseguendo una serie di addominali e Mullins le tiene ferme le ginocchia abbaiandole contro come se fosse il suo istruttore (anche se non lo è).
Mullins dice a Scottie: “You are such a pus-say,”
io l'ho interpretata come: "sei la regina delle fighette"
nel senso che è una super schiappa, è corretto?
ho un dubbio perché successivamente Scottie dice a Mullins: "I’ve got your pus-say" colpendola sul seno.
Seguendo la linea precedente dovrei tradurre con: "Ho (sono) la tua regina delle fighette" che non mi convince del tutto.
Sono bloccata, potete aiutarmi?
grazie
 
  • You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    You are such a pus-say * = You are such a pussy = You are such a weakling

    ’Pussy’ is also a vulgar term for the vulva.

    * ’Puss-say’ is an exaggerated way a gay man might pronounce the word ‘pussy’.
     

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    * ’Puss-say’ is an exaggerated way a gay man might pronounce the word ‘pussy’.
    Interesting: I think of the "-ay" ending as just humorous, nothing to do with parodying how a gay man might talk. This is the first time I've heard "pus-say," but I've heard "we are gonna par-TAY!" for years. Never really thought about where it came from, though.

    You're right about the meaning, given the context: Mullins is humorously calling Scottie a weakling. What on earth she means by "I've got your pus-say" is beyond me, though, especially if she's touching her boobs rather than her, well, pus-say! All I can think of is that it could be a version of "I've got your back" (i.e., I'm here for you), but I'd have to know more about the conversation surrounding the line.
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    I think of the "-ay" ending as just humorous, nothing to do with parodying how a gay man might talk. This is the first time I've heard "pus-say," but I've heard "we are gonna par-TAY!" for years. Never really thought about where it came from, though.
    It’s a woman who says it here, so it’s clearly not just gay men. The ‘tay’ part of the word is usually accompanied by a flipping of the wrist. :D
     
    Last edited:

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    The ‘tay’ part of the word is usually accompanied by a flipping of the wrist. :D
    Not here it isn't (i.e. Canada, not whatever Sarah's translating :D ). So either cultural differences, or else I've been strangely missing something for the last 35 years!

    Just realized that it's the person who gets called a "pus-say" who then says "I've got your pus-say," so it's highly unlikely to mean what I suggested in #3. Starless might be right, or else it might be a funny way of saying "I've got this" (i.e., I can do this, I'm capable). Still just guessing, though.
     

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    I was referring to a gay man saying it, not a straight person.
    I think we're misunderstanding each other somehow. :) All I meant to say is that the pronunciations "pus-say" and "par-tay" have zero associations with gayness for me. You wrote that "’Puss-say’ is an exaggerated way a gay man might pronounce the word ‘pussy’"; for me, an equivalent would be "fab-ulous!", but "pus-say" just doesn't ring that particular bell.
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    I think we're misunderstanding each other somehow. :) All I meant to say is that the pronunciations "pus-say" and "par-tay" have zero associations with gayness for me. You wrote that "’Puss-say’ is an exaggerated way a gay man might pronounce the word ‘pussy’"; for me, an equivalent would be "fab-ulous!", but "pus-say" just doesn't ring that particular bell.
    I have a lot of gay friends and I often hear them Frenchifying words such as ‘party’ in an effort to be funny. There is a suburb in Sydney called Marrickville which many of them refer to as ‘Ville de Marrick’. Anyway, it’s not important. It’s a woman who says it, and she’s clearly trying to be funny. :)
     
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