You are welcome to borrow it

mimi2

Senior Member
vietnam vietnamese
‘Can I borrow your car for this evening?’ ‘ Sure, but Nora’s using it right now. If she brings back in time, you are welcome to borrow it.’
Can I use ‘you will be welcome to borrow it’? Could you tell me the meaning of the usage of the two tenses?
Thanks.
 
  • mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    1. If she brings back in time, you are welcome to borrow it.
    2. If she brings back in time, you will be welcome to borrow it.
    Hi, nzfauna.
    That is what I meant.
     

    nzfauna

    Senior Member
    New Zealand, English
    Firstly: "If she brings it back in time..."

    The second sounds weird. The first sounds correct.

    The only justification I can offer is that the borrowee is welcome at that current point in time (not just in the future when the car might be brought back).
     
    "If she brings it back in time, you are welcome to borrow it."

    This is correct. It's entirely up to you, but you also have the option of adding "then" before the independent clause:

    "If she brings it back in time, then you are welcome to borrow it."

    It's a stylistic preference. Some people like to pair "if" with "then" in a conditional sentence like this. But in spoken English the "then" is usually not required and is often omitted.
     

    mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    Thank you, FrenchBenefits.
    Please explain to me why "will be" is not acceptable?
     
    :tick:The only justification I can offer is that the borrowee is welcome at that current point in time (not just in the future when the car might be brought back).
    "Will be" implies that the person borrowing the car is not welcome in the present, and will never be welcome until the car is returned.
    "Are" implies that the potential borrower is welcome from this point forward to borrow the car if the previous condition (the woman bringing the car back) is met. The "borrowing" is the only thing that may or may not happen in the future. The state of "the borrower being welcome" holds true no matter what happens.
     
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