You aren’t too far behind me at all

J352SAURUS

Member
English
Hi everyone,

I am answering a letter from my friend. I recently graduated from university, but unfortunately she failed one class that she now must repeat so she was unable to graduate on time. She will be able to graduate in a few months once she retakes the class, and I'm trying to reassure her that even though she didn't graduate with me, she's almost there. I'm trying to say:

You aren’t too far behind me at all.

As in, "you will be able to graduate soon", or "I may have graduated, but your graduation is not far away/your graduation is coming soon so don't worry". Does that make sense? This is my attempt:

Non sei troppo indietro affatto di me.

However, I feel like my translation is far too literal (like she's literally not that far behind me), and I also suspect that "affatto" might be in the wrong place. I'm pretty stuck on this one! What are your thoughts?

Thank you very much.
 
  • Necsus

    Senior Member
    Italian (Italy)
    HI. You actually don't need affatto, you can say "Non sei troppo indietro affatto di rispetto a me", or simply a more natural "non sei molto più indietro di me". ;)
     

    J352SAURUS

    Member
    English
    HI. You actually don't need affatto, you can say "Non sei troppo indietro affatto di rispetto a me", or simply a more natural "non sei molto più indietro di me". ;)
    Hi! Thank you for your contribution! I was quite lost with this one, but you've cleared it up very nicely. So does that mean "at all" really isn't translatable in this sense? I guess it's more to soften the sentence and act as a bit of "reassurance" that the distance she is behind me really isn't that far.
     

    Necsus

    Senior Member
    Italian (Italy)
    You can't use affatto because it would mean she is not far from you at all, but that's not true, there is a (little) difference between you two..!
     

    J352SAURUS

    Member
    English
    Affatto is an intensifier, it can be positive or negative, depending from the sentence. ;)
    Oh boy, haha. This will take a while to get the hang of. Thank you! Are you able to show me a positive and negative sentence using "affatto"?
     

    Necsus

    Senior Member
    Italian (Italy)
    Affatto means completely, totally. If you ask me"Ti è piaciuto il film?" and I answer "Affatto" it means very much, otherwise I should say "Niente affatto/Per niente". From Treccani (my underlining):
    affatto avv. [comp. di a e fatto 2]. – Del tutto, interamente: è affatto sordo. Più comunemente, si usa per rafforzare una negazione: non lo conosco affatto, per nulla; e come negazione recisa: niente affatto. Non ha di per sé stesso valore negativo; è perciò ritenuto scorretto l’uso del semplice affatto col senso di «niente affatto, no davvero».
     

    Pietruzzo

    Senior Member
    Italian
    So does that mean "at all" really isn't translatable in this sense?
    You should split the sentence. Eg. "Non sei poi così indietro a me. Per niente! "
    Affatto means completely, totally. If you ask me"Ti è piaciuto il film?" and I answer "Affatto" it means very much, otherwise I should say "Niente affatto
    I guess most people (and I for one) would understand "affatto" and "nient'affatto" as synonymous.
     
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