"You bet I do", "You bet I love her"

roniy

Senior Member
ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
"You bet I do", "You bet I love her"

What does 'you bet' mean here ?

Does saying 'I bet I love her' and saying 'you bet I love her' mean the same ?

Thanks.
 
  • JamesM

    Senior Member
    Hmmm... it's one of those things I haven't really examined, although I hear it all the time. I suppose it's similar to "you can count on the fact that". It means that you could bet on the fact being true and you would be guaranteed to win, I guess.

    "You can count on the fact that I love her."
    "You (could) bet (and win on the fact that) I love her."

    Maybe someone else will have a better explanation. It's a very common expression in American English.

    "Want to go to lunch?"
    "You bet I do!"

    "I bet I love her" would be different from "you bet I love her." I'd expect "I bet I love her" to be spoken if someone suddenly realized why he was behaving a certain way.

    "Why does it bother me to see her with other men? Well, what do you know! I bet I love her."
     

    roniy

    Senior Member
    ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
    Hmmm... it's one of those things I haven't really examined, although I hear it all the time. I suppose it's similar to "you can count on the fact that". It means that you could bet on the fact being true and you would be guaranteed to win, I guess.

    "You can count on the fact that I love her."
    "You (could) bet (and win on the fact that) I love her."

    Maybe someone else will have a better explanation. It's a very common expression in American English.

    "Want to go to lunch?"
    "You bet I do!"

    "I bet I love her" would be different from "you bet I love her." I'd expect "I bet I love her" to be spoken if someone suddenly realized why he was behaving a certain way.

    "Why does it bother me to see her with other men? Well, what do you know! I bet I love her."
    Thanks for your response. But I think I didn't get the second one, "I bet I love her"

    I know that I can say " I bet I am going to win" which means that I am certain that I am going to win.
    Or I am wrong ?

    Thanks.
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Thanks for your response. But I think I didn't get the second one, "I bet I love her"

    I know that I can say " I bet I am going to win" which means that I am certain that I am going to win.
    Or I am wrong ?

    Thanks.
    Actually, I've never heard this phrase used from the point of view of "me". "You bet I love her" is said for emphasis. In other words, it has an almost "don't you dare argue with me" tone, although said jocularly. It says "I love her and if you bet that I don't, you're going to lose big-time". To say "I bet I love her" makes no sense because what am I betting on?
     

    Suehil

    Medemod
    British English
    'I bet' you are going to do something means 'I would be prepared to bet and expect to win', so 'I think it is very likely that you are going to do it' 'I bet I...' is not used so often, but when it is it means the same, 'I think it is very likely that I...'
    In the above explanation, 'I bet I love her..' would mean 'Oh, suddenly I begin to understand, I probably love her and I didn't realise it until now!'
     

    sloopjc

    Senior Member
    UK English
    When I say I love you, you say you better!
    You better, you better, you bet!

    -- The Who


    Bet \Bet\, a. & adv.
    An early form of {Better}. [Obs.]
    [1913 Webster]

    -- From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48


    I agree with everything said so far. Could it also mean, better than you I do!?


     
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