You bet your bobcat

jacdac

Senior Member
Lebanese
He trailed off, unable to remember the name. ‘Mr Jingles,’ Dean said.
<…>
‘That’s right,’ Coffey said ‘Mr Jingles He’s a circus mouse <…>’
You bet your bobcat,’ Harry said, joining us in looking at John Coffey.
Source: The Green Mile by Dtephen King

The bolded phrase means for sure, right? Is it colloquial or King-ism?

Thank you.
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    You bet your <insert something reasonably relevant/humorous/ironic, etc.> is pretty common. (Particularly in AE.)

    I suspect, without evidence it comes from "I'd bet my bottom dollar on it" -> to be so sure of something that you would risk all your money on the outcome, the truth of the idea, the reliability of the statement, etc.
     

    Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    You bet your <insert something reasonably relevant/humorous/ironic, etc.> is pretty common. (Particularly in AE.)
    This is absolutely true. Equally common is "I’d bet my ____".

    In the late 60s, a television show popularized the expression "You bet your bippy."
    Of course, we still don’t know what a bippy is.
     
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