you bet.

Wookie

Senior Member
Korea, Korean
Ross: Thanks, man.
Russ: You bet.

Does "you bet" mean the same as "you're welcome"?
To me, it seems that "you bet" means "yes, you should thank me."
And it sounds a little arrogant.
 
  • nzseries1

    Senior Member
    New Zealand - English
    I can't think of a situation where you would ever reply to "Thanks" with "you bet".

    I am always used to saying "you bet" after a question, for example:

    Ross: Did you have a drink with Marie last night?
    Russ: You bet (yes I certainly did).

    I can't think of a context where it sounds arrogant to me. I think in your case it probably just means "you're welcome". But I think it is quite an AE saying, so lets get their opinion :)
     

    AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    It's quite common in AE.

    We also answer "No problem." in the same way, and might even tack it on to the above reply.

    In this specific exchange, both people are very casual. That second person could very easily answer, "You bet, dude. No problem."


    AngelEyes
     

    kostasdhm

    Member
    Greece, Greek
    I am not a native speaker but in the movie "Casino", there is this scene between the character played by De Niro and a local council-member (call him 'X') where "you bet" is used in a funny way. Essentially De Niro refuses to grant him a favor he was asking and the end of their conversation went like:
    De Niro: (standing up and ending the conversation) "I am sorry"
    - shaking hands -
    X: "you bet"
     

    AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    I never saw that movie, but I wonder if you bet in this instance was short for "Yeah, right." It's used as a noncommital response that carries no sincerity in it.

    I suppose that's why it's so confusing to non-natives! :D

    It seems to make no logical sense. One said with honest, good intentions; the other said sarcastically. (If I'm understanding this movie scene correctly.)

    AngelEyes
     

    AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    Then it's as I thought. In the movie, he was saying, "Yeah, right. You're sorry." And he's thinking it's exactly the opposite, in truth. It's an insincere use of this phrase in AE.

    The thread example was a sincere use of this response. "You bet...it was a pleasure to be of help."

    AngelEyes
     
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